breeding black to splash = ???

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Frozen Feathers, Dec 1, 2007.

  1. Frozen Feathers

    Frozen Feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2007
    Maine
    So, does anyone know if you cross black with splash what you end up with??
    I know I've read somewhere before, but I can't remember.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. verthandi

    verthandi Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 18, 2007
    Maine
    Splash to black is should be all blue, but I still get an occassional black. So I am thinking one of my hens that looks splash is actually just blue mottled looking.
     
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Yup, supposed to get all blues.
     
  4. Blisschick

    Blisschick not rusty

    1,875
    10
    191
    Feb 20, 2007
    Shepherd, Texas
    Quote:Probably so. It's not unusual for a lighter blue to have streaks of black. I have a few like that.
     
  5. SisterFlash

    SisterFlash Chillin' With My Peeps

    so since the black carry no blue and the splash care a double blue gene and you only need one blue and one black to get blue bird....why do breeders breed blue to blue?

    Why would they not keep a black and splash so they always produced 100% blue?

    just wondering?

    Barb [​IMG]
     
  6. Chellester

    Chellester Chillin' With My Peeps

    752
    1
    151
    Jun 22, 2007
    Nor Cal
    This year I bred a Silkie splash rooster to a Silkie black hen and hatched 7 chicks. Out of the 7 chicks, I got 2 splash, 2 blues, and 3 blacks.
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I breed blue to blue because I dont want to get all blues. If you want all blues, yes, you could breed splash to black all the time.
     
  8. Flufnstuffs~FluffySilkies

    Flufnstuffs~FluffySilkies Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2007
    NY
    What colors can you get from a mixed Silkie flock?
    This is my understanding of the subject. I tried to make it simple, short to the point but useful.
    I am not an expert and I don’t even play one on TV. :)

    Basic Genetics

    This is just touching on the basics of color genes. Genetics can become very involved and complicated.
    Keep in mind that there are many factors that can change the expected out come.
    This information is for beginners not those who are already knowledgeable on advanced genetics.

    Most Silkie Breeders keep their birds separated by color, The only mixed color pen I have is Blue/Splash. If you have a small back yard flock for your own enjoyment here is the basics.

    Blue X Blue will result in 50% Blue, 25% Black and 25% Splash
    Blue X Splash will result in 50% Blue and 50% Splash
    Blue X Black will result in 50% Blue and 50% Black
    Black X Splash will result in 100% Blue
    Black Bird + 1 regular Blue gene = Blue Bird + another Blue gene = Splash Bird
    Splash X Splash should produce all Splash
    Splash X Black should produce all Blue
    Black is a Dominant Color

    White hides colors. As a example just imagine a colored bird that was dipped in white wash. Underneath all the white it is still its real color, but you cannot see it. The color is genetically present, but the phenotype (appearance) is not there.
    Or you can think of white as an OFF switch. It turns OFF the bio-chemical mechanism that causes pigment to be present in the feathers. White is a recessive gene in Silkies, it takes 2 white genes to get a white bird, but a white bird could also have other color genes in it which the white is masking. "Risk you take when buying birds/eggs from a mixed flock" I also think it's important to mention that some whites carry the silver gene, they hatch out a gray color and feather out pure white.

    The color "blue" is a "diluter" of black, modifying the black coloration into a blue therefor you should consider keeping your Blacks separated, but you can pen your blue/blacks/splash together if you want, a lot of people do. Another thing to consider is mixing your Blue & Splashes in the same pen the Splash color/effect can become blurred/muddied over time if repeated generations are mated Splash X Splash.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2007
  9. Chellester

    Chellester Chillin' With My Peeps

    752
    1
    151
    Jun 22, 2007
    Nor Cal
    Quote:If Splash x Black should produce all Blue, how did I get the color combination above? Is it possible that the Black hen is actually a dark Blue? (It's the hen pictured in my avatar.)

    If I do indeed have a dark Blue instad of a Black, how do I tell the difference between a dark Blue and Black? She sure looks Black to me! [​IMG]
     
  10. Hope0491

    Hope0491 Chillin' With My Peeps

    490
    0
    149
    Jan 30, 2007
    VA/PA
    Flufnstuffs~FluffySilkies :

    What colors can you get from a mixed flock?
    This is my understanding of the subject. I tried to make it simple, short to the point but useful.
    I am not an expert and I don’t even play one on TV. :)

    Basic Genetics

    This is just touching on the basics of color genes. Genetics can become very involved and complicated.
    Keep in mind that there are many factors that can change the expected out come. This information is for beginners not those who are already knowledgeable on advanced genetics.

    Most Silkie Breeders keep their birds separated by color, The only mixed color pen I have is Blue/Splash. If you have a small back yard flock for your own enjoyment here is the basics.

    Blue X Blue will result in 50% Blue, 25% Black and 25% Splash
    Blue X Splash will result in 50% Blue and 50% Splash
    Blue X Black will result in 50% Blue and 50% Black
    Black X Splash will result in 100% Blue
    Black Bird + 1 regular Blue gene = Blue Bird + another Blue gene = Splash Bird
    Splash X Splash should produce all Splash
    Splash X Black should produce all Blue
    Black is a Dominant Color

    White hides colors. As a example just imagine a colored bird that was dipped in white wash. Underneath all the white it is still its real color, but you cannot see it. The color is genetically present, but the phenotype (appearance) is not there.
    Or you can think of white as an OFF switch. It turns OFF the bio-chemical mechanism that causes pigment to be present in the feathers. White is a recessive gene in Silkies, it takes 2 white genes to get a white bird, but a white bird could also have other color genes in it which the white is masking. "Risk you take when buying birds/eggs from a mixed flock" I also think it's important to mention that some whites carry the silver gene, they hatch out a gray color and feather out pure white.

    The color "blue" is a "diluter" of black, modifying the black coloration into a blue therefor you should consider keeping your Blacks separated, but you can pen your blue/blacks/splash together if you want, a lot of people do. Another thing to consider is mixing your Blue & Splashes in the same pen the Splash color/effect can become blurred/muddied over time if repeated generations are mated Splash X Splash.


    Mel, I am always impressed with how knowledgeable you are!!!!! I am very happy, blessed and grateful to have you as a chicken friend!! [​IMG]

    P.S. LOVE your birds, Mel!! [​IMG]

    ~Lacey​
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2007

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by