Breeding Coop and Pen

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Corey NC, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. Corey NC

    Corey NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    North Carolina
    I am starting to think about building a breeding coop for about 5 hens and a roo. Not sure whether it will be standards or batams yet but I was wondering how big it should be, would 4 x 8 be too small? I'd love to see pics of ya'lls breeding pens to get a good idea of how much room they need.

    Thanks!
     
  2. allen wranch

    allen wranch Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 11, 2007
    San Marcos, TX
    The standard square footage for chickens is 4 square feet for standards and 2 square feet for bantams.

    It would be rather crowded for 6 standard chickens in a 4 x 8 coop.

    Look at the thread at the top of this page and also in the BYC reference section. There are lots of good coop ideas there.
     
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Corey, you know I have Suede in with Velvet and two Brahmas and soon will have another Blue Orp pullet in my former guinea/former nursery coop. You also know how huge he is and Velvet is no lightweight herself. Basically, I have the same size coop as you mentioned, 4.5 x 7.5' and they seem to do just fine in it. I wouldn't put more than my five large birds in it, I dont think. If I had bantams, I could put maybe 9 or 10 in there, IMO. 4 x 8 = 32 sq ft which, if you go by 4 sq ft per bird, you should be able to put 8 standards in it, but that would be too tight, I think, if they had to be closed up for any length of time.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2007
  4. allen wranch

    allen wranch Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 11, 2007
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    You also need to consider the placement of roosts, feeder and/or waterer in your coop when you consider the square footage.

    Birds generate a lot of heat. Although good when roosting in the winter, the summers could be a problem when it is already hot.
     

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