Breeding for Egg Color

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Extra Java, Oct 8, 2012.

  1. Extra Java

    Extra Java Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, I know that:

    White + Blue = Light Blue
    White + Brown = Light Brown
    Blue + Brown = Green

    What happens to egg color when you cross BLUE + GREEN?

    Roll of the dice? Various shades of?

    Thanks
     
  2. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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  3. Extra Java

    Extra Java Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's exactly what I was reading to cause me to ask this question...didn't see anything there regarding BLUE + GREEN eggs.

    Maybe I missed something?
     
  4. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    No, you didn't miss it. She just doesn't spell that one out. So blue is a blue shell all the way through. Brown is a white shell with the brown painted on. Green is blue shell (since blue is dominant over white) plus a bit of brown paint. So Green plus blue would most likely tend to a shell that looks more blue than the green looked. To a man, such shell would be blue. To a woman, it would tend more towards aqua or even turquoise.
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Everyone sees colours slightly differently. Some men see colours very distinctly; others do not. The same goes for women. I have never seen a blue egg that did not look like it was on the green side of blue--enough so that calling it "blue" does not bring to mind what I consider pure blue: the blue colour in a crayola box. At best they look like this or this.

    The amount of pigment in the shell will vary depending on 1) whether the bird is O/O or O/o+ and 2) where she is in her laying cycle. Eggs laid soon after a molt will have much more pigment than ones laid shortly before a molt. The same goes for prown pigment "painted" onto the shell surface, although there are many genes that affect the brown, not just one.
     
  6. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    All the men I know personally call what I think of as Turquoise, blue. It is true that people see colors differently. Point is, according to the charts, when you breed one color egg laying type to another, the result ends up being somewhere in between. Whether it ends up looking blue to you or tending towards green, depends.
     
  7. Extra Java

    Extra Java Chillin' With My Peeps

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    THIS is exactly what I was looking for!

    Thank you for taking the time to explain so clearly.

    [​IMG] I finally get it.
     

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