breeding question

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by minister man, May 8, 2011.

  1. minister man

    minister man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 9, 2010
    New Brunswick
    I was reading that if you use the sprial mating plan with 4 pens it would be about 16 years before new blood would be needed, and 12 years for 3 pens and if you had only 2 pens then 5 years. I am wondering about 2 pens, but only replacing the family ( pen) in thier second year. Which means one year you replace one family and the next the other family ect. According to my calculations, if the above information is true, then breeding one family at a time should double the above numbers and mean that I would be able to go about 10 years 'till new blood.

    Does that sound right or is there something wrong with my thinking on that? I am thinking about using it with my silkies which are "brooders Only" birds with two families of 12 f and 2 males. One family sets on thier own eggs and the pullet family that is not being replaced could be used for hatching other eggs. What do you think?
     
  2. La Mike

    La Mike (Always Slightly Off)

    Nov 20, 2009
    louisiana
    I introduce new blood every 4 years period. Not sure what requirements would be but I would think it would be more a personal choice.
    And yes your other group could hatch whatever you want [​IMG]
     
  3. agstanley

    agstanley Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 21, 2008
    Conway, MO
    I run my breeders a little tighter. I try to introduce a new cockbird every two years....If I can find one. Sometimes, a suitable replacement is not readily available....but that is my goal.

    Rotation of the hens every year with the introduction of a new rooster/cockerel every two years, should keep your genetic pool from becoming to narrow. Especially if you are starting with two pens. It also gives you the opportunity to make adjustments....You have adult birds from the prior matings to evaluate and to help make your breeding choices.

    Regards

    Angela Stanley
    Rockgate Farm
     
  4. minister man

    minister man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 9, 2010
    New Brunswick
    Finding new males is the problem around here. That is why I am looking to keep things going without going outside too often. I am setting up a new flock of SS Hamburgs for next year, I have 3 dozen eggs in the incubator from a local fellow who got his birds from Murray Mc Murray. And I am getting a year old trio next weekend from a show breeder. I am going to use the females from the eggs to set up the families and raise some males from the trio to start with. That will make them quite diverse in the begining, and i am hoping to use males from one family on females of the other family, just replacing one family per year. I will probably keep an eye out for a new male or two, adding them when I find them. I was just wondering how soon it would become important to find one. And with the silkies, I just thought it sounded so easy. Every thing that hatches that year is of the same family, less marking, keeping track ect.
     
  5. agstanley

    agstanley Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 21, 2008
    Conway, MO
    Line breeding is OK, but as a breeder, I shy away from it.
    I breed toward exhibition quality birds. When you line breed, you accentuate not only the good qualities of your line, but the faults. Selective breeding will only carry you so far....as they all have the same genetic make up. If you have two separate lines to start with, you've got a good base. Just remember to cull without mercy, and introduce new blood whenever possible.

    An old string man once told me that it cost just as much to feed a bad bird, as it does to feed a good one.

    Good luck!
     

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