Breeds for me and my grandparents

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Min27, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. Min27

    Min27 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm looking to expand my flock from 3 chickens to about 6 or 7 chickens. My grandparents are also very interested in getting chickens of their own.

    We just need to decide on a breed. The problem I have is two of my chickens are bantams, and I was looking more for a full size egg laying breed that was calm, friendly and didn't mind being cuddled regularly. I was going to go with white leghorns (because I've never been able to get a white chicken) but my parents think I should get the bantam variety so they don't completely beat up the bantams (does anyone know if the bantam leghorn is as friendly as the full size one?). Is it safe to mix bantams with full size chickens? Although I do have a lovely isabrown that has gotten on with the bantams. I would get more isabrowns if they weren't so likely to develop problems after two years of laying (one died because of it).

    My grandparents want the chickens mostly for the eggs. I was going to try getting them langshans, because they wanted black chickens and I've heard the langshans are good layers and live longer than isabrowns. However australorps are available year round at my local produce place.

    There's still a lot of choice right now.
     
  2. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    It should be fine if you introduce your large fowl chicks at a young age to your bantams, mine get along with a few disciplinary pecks here and there http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2013/04/when-to-move-chicks-from-brooder-to.html. My large fowl White Leghorns are very friendly and like to be pet more than my other chicks, it mainly depends on your choice even breeds that are said to be flighty and friendly can be tame if you interact with them alot. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2013
  3. Min27

    Min27 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. We were going to get point of lays (because we don't have time to go through chicks again) and keep the different flocks in separate runs. I wanted to gradually introduce mine to the chickens I already have, but I know there will be a big fight while they try to work out the pecking order.

    At the produce store, they have large leghorns, australorps and isabrowns available year round (and the staff told me they were vaccinated). However I was looking for bantams just in case the chickens I got became bullies (but if large chickens can get along with bantams at laying age then I'll just get normal size chickens). Only now have I discovered that bantams can be a fair bit more expensive than large chickens (maybe it's because they're harder to get). I'm still on the fence about whether to settle with regular leghorns or try to find bantams somewhere else.
     
  4. Spikes Chooks

    Spikes Chooks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd recommend the Australorps which you know you can get. Mine is super friendly, smart (ish!), lays nearly every day and is really beautiful!
     
  5. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    We had a silkie and two frizzle bantams. We then added four faverolle pullets. One of the bantams is still head chook :) and they all get on fine. Only have a bit of remember your place pecking at treat time and as much of that comes from the bantams as the full size favs.

    The faverolles are the most beautifully tempered birds. Not at all flighty and easily picked up. We got them as ten week olds but they still are very quiet and after a month in quarantine and two weeks in a run next to the bantams put them all in together with no problems.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2013
  6. Min27

    Min27 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote: That's good to hear. I'll have to look up some breeders though because I think those ones are hard to get in my area.


    Quote: I looked after my sister's australorps for a while. They laid lots of eggs and became very friendly after a while. They wouldn't let me pick them up though, but I think it was because my sister never picked them up (well she did but only to clip their wings). We'll probably settle with australorps for my grandparents if our choices become very limited. I'd really like to have a white chicken though.
     
  7. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suggest getting a few different breeds so you have variety.

    You are in Australia, so you have to have Australorps. You said you wanted a white one, so a White Leghorn would be good. Although, most Leghorns in the United States do not like to be handled.

    If you are looking for friendly hens, you might try Orpingtons. Buff Orpingtons are most common in the United States.
     
  8. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    I didn't realise you were a local Min:).
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2013
  9. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Red Stars ( also called Red Sex Links, Cinnamon Queens) are friendly too and they lay extra large dark brown eggs I had a Red Star that layed an egg almost every day even through winter.
     
  10. Min27

    Min27 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote: Awesome. Someone else I can talk to about dealing with magpies. They swoop my chickens all the time. (Maybe that issue is already covered in another thread)

    Quote: Thanks for the advice. It's not overly important that I have a white chicken. I'd just like to have one. We've been through lots of generations of chickens and never gotten a white one. I'm aware chickens in general don't like to be handled, but I've experienced that some breeds tolerate it more than others. My isabrown just sits and lets me hug her when I can catch her.

    Quote: There are orpingtons in Australia, but they are a special breed and I only ever see them at the shows. I might have to look up a breeder.

    Price is also an issue. In my area, anything that isn't an australorp, leghorn or isabrown costs about $55 per chicken. If I'm lucky, maybe a breeder will sell for cheaper.
     

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