Bright green tomato plant - good or bad?

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by drewskimac, Mar 23, 2018.

  1. drewskimac

    drewskimac Songster

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    As an experiment, I sprinkled mealworm Frass (poop) onto he top of the soil around one (1) of my tomato starts, and left the other eleven (eleven) without the “fertilizer”. The other 11 all look the same, while the 1 with the mealworm Frass is bright green. I’m assuming this is due to the high nitrogen content in the mealworm Frass. My question: is it a good or bad thing? The plant I’ve circled was the mealworm Frass treated plant.
     
  2. Foster's Freehold

    Foster's Freehold Songster

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    I don't know much about the nitrogen ration in Frass, we just used mealworms to feed hedgehogs.

    I do know that barring any other issue with the plant, green is good.
     
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  3. drewskimac

    drewskimac Songster

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    87904DE3-24EA-45CA-9E73-0194E39B1C09.jpeg
     
  4. puffypoo

    puffypoo Like Machine

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    well it certainly looks better!
     
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  5. drewskimac

    drewskimac Songster

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    So the bright green is a good thing in the tomato seedling? It’s my first time growing tomato seedlings and I wasn’t sure whether it was better for them to be dull & dark green or bright green.
     
  6. puffypoo

    puffypoo Like Machine

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    I don't really have any gardening experience, so I don't know if it's a good or bad thing. :/
     
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  7. Foster's Freehold

    Foster's Freehold Songster

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    The dark green ones are better. It looks like you might be having some burn issues with it being yellow green.

    I'd either repot it with fresh soil, let it ride and see how it does or run lots of water through it.

    See if you can find a nitrogen count for Frass.
     
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  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    All the same variety? The leaves are bigger. This may be a function of the lighter coloring. It does not look as if the leaves are "burnt". If you have plenty of tomato plants and they are all the same variety, I'd let it ride. Mark that plant and see how it produces throughout the season in comparison with the rest.
     
  9. drewskimac

    drewskimac Songster

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    Yep, same variety. I will do that. Do you think I should treat it with more of the fertilizer (Frass) when I plant it ?
     
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    That depends entirely on how well it compares to the rest of them at that time.

    I give all of my seedlings an occasional dose of epsom salt. It has an immediate "greening up" affect, as well as kicking the plants into nice stocky growth. Recommended application rate is 1/2 - 1 tsp./gallon of water every 1 - 4 weeks, depending on soil conditions and plant response. You can mix your liquid fertilizer in the same gallon of water.
     
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