Brine bath after plucking? What kind of "brine"?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by itsy, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. itsy

    itsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sure this is on here somewhere, but I can't find it with searches and it's not in the stickies above.

    I've decided to process a chicken today (for the first time.) I need to pick up some brine or salt solution for the first icebath cooler, correct? I know it's not regular table salt. What is it called?

    Thank you [​IMG] I'll be checking this post from my phone while at the grocery store.
     
  2. Two Creeks Farm

    Two Creeks Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We use kosher salt for brines here.
     
  3. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kosher is considered the salt of choice for most brines, as it has the most "clean" flavor (although frankly I don't see much of a difference). Many brines also add some sugar, and if the goal is to season as well as tenderize and moisten the meat, you can add various herbs, spices, and flavoring agents.

    If you use regular table salt, they generally suggest the "Free Running" or non-iodized salt. You can use sea salt if you want, but its expensive.
     
  4. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A Chemistry lesson, fact... All salt consists of two atoms ... Sodium and Cloride... everything else is a label for marketing and a hike in price for a fancy name.
     
  5. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Quote:Finaly a voice of reason.
     
  6. Two Creeks Farm

    Two Creeks Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    True, but Kosher has no preservatives and it draws moisture a tad bit better due to its crystal size.
     
  7. chickenfeverforever

    chickenfeverforever Chillin' With My Peeps

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    YEAH, You decided to process them. I knwo when I did my turkey last year my grocery store had a brine in the season asile. It had thyme and rosemarry and cloves in it along with other spices and it was really good.
     
  8. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:True. All water is water, but Dasani tastes a lot better than the water that comes out of my tap, which often smells and tastes fishy. Safe but unpleasant.

    It's not the salt, its the impurities and the additives that alter the flavor.
     
  9. itsy

    itsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I ended up using the Sea Salt. You can read about my terrible adventure here . I have no idea what the purpose of the first salt bath is for, but I've seen it so many times that I assumed I needed it as well. I used two coolers. The first had sea salt water with ice and the second was just water with ice. What exactly is the purpose of the salt bath?
     
  10. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I guess I didn't pick up the subtleties of your first post -- I was thinking more of a brining to moisten the meat, which would be done later before you cook it, but no harm done by any means.

    The purpose of this first salt bath is to draw out impurities -- salt is good for that. You will notice how disgusting the water gets after the meat is in there a while. IMHO, it makes things taste much better. I do this with grocery store chicken, too.
     

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