Broad Spectrum Antibiotic when you don't know what's wrong

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kuntrygirl, Aug 13, 2011.

  1. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    I was up late last night and I was reading a lot of topics on many threads. I specifically focused on this particular area (Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures) because I love the "medication" side of animal science and because it is always good to know and learn what other chicken owners are dealing with in the event something happens to my chickens, l will know what to to because of everyone else's experience. As I was reading, I noticed that there are different meds for specific reasons. My question is, what if you don't know what is wrong with your chicken and you want to give your chicken some type of antibiotic because you can't really pinpoint what the problem is with your chicken and your chicken could possibly have some type of bacteria infection that is setting in which in turn causing them to not act "normal".

    For example.................I was reading a thread and someone 's chicken was limping but the chicken showed no signs of bumblefoot or any cuts, scratches or other injuries but the owner could obviously see that something was with her chicken. In a case like that, is it in the best interest of the chicken to give the chicken some type of "antibiotic" in attempt to help the chicken in the event something is going on inside of the chicken and you can't pin point. Would giving an antibiotic to a chicken for a non specific illness do more harm?

    I know a lot of us give liquid vitamins, electrolytes, etc. but in this case, I'm wondering about a specific antibiotice to adminster. If there is a antibiotic to give to a chicken when you just don't know what is wrong, what would you all suggest?

    What is your thought on a situation like that?
     
  2. Niss

    Niss Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I did it. I have a pullet that can't stand and leans to the side. No bumblr foot, no external wounds, nothing so grossly out of place I could pin point it. I assumed based on the stinky poo she's "sick" and treated with sulmet. 5 days later there is no change, do I guess it did not work.
    I'm new and see this whole thing as a learning process. Too bad I missed what to do for tbis little one.
     
  3. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:Is she still alive?
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Two things: as far as respiratory stuff, if the bird has a virus, no antibiotic is useful for that. Secondly, if the bird has one of the common carrier type diseases, like CRD or Coryza, even if she recovers, she will remain a carrier; in other words, the disease stays with the bird, who can infect others.


    I'm not in favor of any antibiotic being administered when you are flying blind, though I understand the desperate feeling that comes with being helpless to fix what's wrong with a bird and using a "shot in the dark" approach. It makes you feel better to do something.


    Maybe you should list your bird's symptoms and see what others think may be wrong, though internet diagnosis isn't the best way to find some things out.
     
  5. ChicKat

    ChicKat Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    kuntrygurl

    Wouldn't you be far more concerned that randomly giving antibiotic for an undiagnosed problem could breed drug-resistant strains? IMO people give too many meds, and take too many meds too casually.
    With the: "sick-chicken-so-give-drugs" approach, how could a person determine dosage and duration?

    It would be better (once again IMO) to get an exact diagnosis and treat the exact problem. (Infact, it is that way in just about every problem---not just chicken illnesses. )


    I so understand our wish for a "silver bullet" that will cure all--- I'm not sure that is best for the chicken though.
     
  6. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:I don't have chicken's that have any problems. It was kinda like a "What if" question. I know that there are times when I have read problems when chicken owner's have problems but don't know what's wrong with their bird. I was just curious to hear what others thought about treating a bird not knowing what's exactly wrong. You hit it on the head, when you said, "flying blind" and using a "shot in the dark" approach. I agree that I think it probably would make a person feel better to do something but at the same time, a person could be doing harm to the bird.
     
  7. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:It was just a "What if" question, to see how what others thought. I don't have any sick birds.
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I'm sorry, I misunderstood that part. I do think that most folks, in lieu of taking their bird to an avian vet, are using a shotgun approach, trying everything, hoping something will "stick" and cure the bird. If you go through this section of the forum, you see that most are treating their birds blindly, meaning they may have an educated guess from some other members, but they really don't know for sure what they are treating and if it is any more than a waste of time and money to do so, i.e., using antibiotics for viral infections.
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Denagard is a good choice.
     
  10. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:Thank you!
     

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