Broad Winged Hawk Attacked Buff Brahma

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Rothbard, Dec 14, 2014.

  1. Rothbard

    Rothbard Out Of The Brooder

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    So one of my favorite Buff Brahmas was attacked by a broad winged hawk (3 ft wingspan by my estimation) about 20 mins before dusk by the coop. Somehow my chicken managed to survive the initial divebomb attack and literally pushed herself into a tight brick crevice in which the hawk was only able to pluck feathers off as well as take small pieces off her back. I believe this evasive maneuver is the only reason that she's alive and her head is attached. She has a few puncture holes (1 may have gotten lung) and serious cuts, but we'll see what happens in the next 48 hours after she was cleaned up with povidone iodine and triple antibiotic

    ointment. Here's the photo: [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickyChickens

    ChickyChickens Chickening Around

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    Oh my, that looks really bad!!! Hope all goes well!!!
     
  3. ChickyChickens

    ChickyChickens Chickening Around

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Rothbard

    Rothbard Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 14, 2014
    She died this morning. The deep wounds (I suspect kidney and lungs) were probably too much and the infections probably went septic.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Welcome to BYC, and sorry for your loss. We have hawks around much of the year in our chicken yard. Your chicken looked so pale in the photo, so she may have died from the blood loss, or internal injuries. I love to let mine free range, and unfortunately these things can happen.
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Hawk ID may not be correct.
     
  7. FarmerWife

    FarmerWife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well there goes my hope for hawks not killing larger chickens. I just hatched some Lt. Brahma chicks hoping that if we brought in some larger chickens, the hawks might leave our chickens alone. They keep coming around, but haven't taken any yet, this year. Last year one of our small hens was taken. I hate hawks, I saw a pair of them swoop down on one of our neighbors chickens down the road the other day, poor thing was screaming, but I would have never made it there in time to chase them away to save the chicken. I hope the attacks on your flock don't continue now that they know you have them. Maybe you might think about putting them on lock down for a couple of days. I do that when we have a hawk come into the yard, they come back for a few days, and if they don't find anything, they don't come around, for a while anyway. If your chickens free range, you will have casualties, mine also free range. I'm constantly watching. Usually the roo's sound the alarm when the hawks are near. Unless they come out of nowhere. Sorry for your loss, poor thing looked so pale.
     
  8. Rothbard

    Rothbard Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 14, 2014
    I've gone back and forth on this. Initially, I didn't think it was a redtail since I didn't see the signature reddish brown tail but it could have been a juvenile without the established markings. I only saw the hawk very briefly from behind as it darted off in the distance behind the coop roof. I do know that the broad wings are much smaller in terms of core body size but have a knack for plucking feathers with great proficiency.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  9. Rothbard

    Rothbard Out Of The Brooder

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    In retrospect, I should have probably administered a heavy dose of oral antibiotic or syringe injectable within the first 2 hours of the attack. Perhaps, I underestimated the depth of the wounds and the type of nasty pathogens & bacteria that reside on the talons of a bird of prey. Once the internals are breached like that and with the shock to the immune system, it's a real uphill climb to keep the bird from sliding very quickly into a near death state.
     
  10. FarmerWife

    FarmerWife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You did your best. I usually keep a good supply of various antibiotics around in case one of the flock becomes sick, or has an injury. I think the injuries were too severe for your poor girl to survive, I don't think it's because you didn't administer any antibiotics, you cleaned her up, and used topical meds, there was no way for you to know how far down the injuries went. I hope it doesn't happen again, but that hawk now knows there are chickens there, it's very possible it will return. Keep a close watch. Good luck to you, I know first hand how hard it is to keep them away.

    Blessings,
    Dianna
     

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