Broiler Tractor Question

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by deannd, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. deannd

    deannd Out Of The Brooder

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    May 21, 2010
    Marin County, California
    If I understand correctly, broilers (cornish cross) only need to be in the brooder for two weeks and then can go outside into the mobile tractor. Is this correct? It seems so young to be without heart lamps.

    To date I have only raised layers and I keep them under the lights for 6-8 weeks. I would love to hear how long other people keep their broilers and layers in the brooder and when their are coop ready.

    Thanks....
     
  2. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

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    Mar 16, 2009
    onchiota NY
    Quote:I have my first batch of meaties now and they are 2 weeks old today-I never used a heat lamp-it was suggested but I didnt because it was in the 80's that week-they are all fine and healthy-they are in oens right now and outside this coming weekend to free range for the first time!
     
  3. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Feb 12, 2009
    Ohio
    Quote:I have my first batch of meaties now and they are 2 weeks old today-I never used a heat lamp-it was suggested but I didnt because it was in the 80's that week-they are all fine and healthy-they are in oens right now and outside this coming weekend to free range for the first time!

    I lost 4 due to using a heat lamp, this last batch I started. None of them now seem to be cold even though it was below 60 last night, they are in an attached garage
     
  4. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

    25,007
    69
    388
    Mar 16, 2009
    onchiota NY
    Quote:I have my first batch of meaties now and they are 2 weeks old today-I never used a heat lamp-it was suggested but I didnt because it was in the 80's that week-they are all fine and healthy-they are in oens right now and outside this coming weekend to free range for the first time!

    I lost 4 due to using a heat lamp, this last batch I started. None of them now seem to be cold even though it was below 60 last night, they are in an attached garage

    Ot got down to 45-50 one night and I raced down to the garage in the am-all perfectly fine! I am always going to order my meaties this time of year!
     
  5. deannd

    deannd Out Of The Brooder

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    May 21, 2010
    Marin County, California
    Thanks for the feedback. I guess that makes sense this time of year, but it sounds like this local farm does this year round. I can't imagine putting a 2 week old chick out doors. Do you know if broilers can withstand lower temps as chicks than layers?
     
  6. buckeyejerseygiants

    buckeyejerseygiants Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 24, 2010
    I don't know this for a fact but from experience it seems that broilers produce much more body heat than standard breed chicks. I'm sure this is to their advantage in cooler temperatures and they seem to have no problems in the spring and fall so long as there is a sizable (not 4 or 5) number of them. On my last batch of 50 I had the lamps off after the first day whereas the laying chicks I bought with them had and used a lamp at night until they were 3 weeks old. I don't know of anyone that raises broilers on pasture year round, though. I can't image they would feather out (those sporting baboon butts, especially) well enough to be in a wintery environment at 2 weeks.
     

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