broken eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by 3cutechicks, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. 3cutechicks

    3cutechicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    Cinderella has had a shell less egg and 2 eggs out of the shells within the last 5 days and 1 decent egg. It looks like she pooped them out instead of laying them. Is she sick or could it be the lay feed I am giving her? it is new to her. crumbles instead of pellets.[​IMG]
     
  2. Dawn419

    Dawn419 Lost in the Woods

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    Has she just started laying? If so, it could just be her body getting regulated/adjusted to her laying cycle.

    Also, make sure she has calcium available whether it's oyster shell or crushed up egg shell.

    Hope this is some help!


    Dawn
     
  3. 3cutechicks

    3cutechicks Out Of The Brooder

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    well our local feed guy said they don't need oyster shell til they are older. she is not even one.
     
  4. Dawn419

    Dawn419 Lost in the Woods

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    I, for one, disagree with him and I'm sure many other members will also.

    One thing I've learned, since getting back into chickens, is that the feed store people don't know as much as they should/could. Just my opinion, of course! [​IMG]

    The girls need that extra calcium when they begin laying.

    From the FAQ page:

    8. One of our chickens laid an egg without a shell. Is this a cause for concern?

    A soft or even no-shelled egg is something that happens occasionally in even healthy hens. It's generally no cause for concern, unless there is other sign of illness or it's a regular occurance.

    There's no need to separate your hen. What you may want to consider is adding some calcium to the diet if you haven't already. This can be given in the form of ground oyster shells, or other calcium suppliments.
    submitted by Doug , answered by admin , last updated Apr 22, 2009

    Hope this is some help!


    Dawn​
     
  5. 3cutechicks

    3cutechicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    Thanks. It was helpful. I was giving them shell for a while and didn't buy any more. Her eggs were especially thick shelled. I just wasnt sure if maybe rats were sneaking in and trying to eat or if her step sister pecked at it. thanks. I ll get some tomorrow just in case.
     
  6. purecountrychicken

    purecountrychicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah they do need the oyster shell. I started giving my flock oyster shell when they were about 13 weeks old and I have never gotten a thin shell egg. So it is important for them to have it.
     
  7. Buck Creek Chickens

    Buck Creek Chickens Have Incubator, Will Hatch

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    do your chickens go outside or can get in the sun. they need sunlight for vit. D?( I think its D) just like we do and can get it from sunlight it helps the chickens deal with the calcium so it get absorbed better. I also feed my older hens A,D & E, it helps them use the calcium better.

    i'm not saying not to use oyester shell, I offer it all the time in a open bin.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2009
  8. 3cutechicks

    3cutechicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2009
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    ok Thanks everyone. I hope it stops. She has the pretty eggs:yiipchick
     
  9. tellynpeep

    tellynpeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hopefully it's just a dietary problem. Possibly it could be salpingitis (infection of the oviduct.) Good luck.
     
  10. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    My Coop
    If she is a pullet and has just started laying, it's not uncommon for them to lay soft or shell less eggs. I have a dish of free choice oyster shells by the birds feed. They will take what they want and need.
     

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