Broken shell in vent, vet visit, antibiotics, etc.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Khalpers, May 21, 2019.

  1. Khalpers

    Khalpers Chirping

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    This morning, there was a shell-less (and rather scrambled) egg under the roost. I figured out the culprit was my Ameraucauna, Henrietta, pretty quickly because she had a piece of egg stuck to her vent. She's two years old, a reliable egg layer, very docile good girl. I got her in a shallow tub and washed her vent. There were a few shards of egg shells I gently pulled out. Rinsed her off. She ate a couple of mealworms but was staying away from the others in the yard. I was worried that she might have more shell inside of her, so I called the vet.

    The vet took an x-ray. They didn't see any pieces of shell, her crop was full, and she had some rocks in her gizzard. Everything looked good. While there, she pooped a couple times and it was pale white and goopy, like a puddle. They took a culture to check for mycoplasma gallisepticum and also mentioned it could be egg drop syndrome (No contact with ducks or geese.) Their shells are always normal. I ate two of her eggs last night and didn't notice anything different about them. I offer calcium every so often. I've had trouble keeping it in a separate bowl in the run because they knock it over and don't eat it. (Must come up with something for that.) They actually all ate a bit just last week when I offered. The always eat a layer feed (although I did change it up recently because the store was out of the one I prefer). I do lure them back into the run with a small bit of mealworms a couple of times a day, but they don't get any leftovers.

    I got her home and set her up on the screened in porch. She'll have to be quarantined at least until the culture comes back in three days. I think we'll take her inside for the night because the porch is not predator-proof. She is drinking quite a bit, pooped more (a lot like before but also yellow-brownish) but isn't showing interest in food. We've offered calcium, layer feed (the one we always get), mealworms and even a suet block, and she's not eating. She is drinking a lot. I put her in the yard, and she's sort of just standing in one place for a long time, then moving to a different place, then standing there. Not foraging. Now she's standing by the run and listening to her flockmates complaining that they can't come out. (There are five of them, and they have a coop and spacious run.) One thing I am noticing is that she is holding her tail feathers down further than usual.

    Neither she nor any of the four flockmates have any signs of respiratory distress, such as nasal or eye discharge, sneezing, coughing. (Anything else I should look for?) The vet gave me some antibiotic called Tetroxy HCA-280 and said not to use it until she shows signs of respiratory problems. I'm concerned that she's not eating. I haven't felt her crop since this morning. (She's fleeing me pretty successfully after this morning. UPDATE: Her crop feels empty.)

    Is there anything I should be looking for or doing? Would you start the antibiotics? (I know I can't eat the eggs for a long time afterwards, which is OK with me.) She's a pet to me and my favorite girl. But I am also realistic in knowing that chickens do not have long lifespans. I hope that she can hang on!

    Thank you so much. Any advice is appreciated.

    Erica
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
  2. RumneyRoost

    RumneyRoost Chirping

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    I don't have any experience with MG so I'm not much help on that front.

    It's good that she's drinking. Hopefully she just needs a day to get over the egg ordeal. I'm sure the trip to the vet would have been stressful as well. My legbar laid two soft-shelled eggs yesterday and wasn't feeling too hot, I forced some calcium +D3 pills into her and she seems to be back to normal today *knock on wood*.

    I keep my oyster shell in an old tuna can that's screwed to the wall in the coop (away from any roosts so they don't poop in it).
     
    Willowspirit and Khalpers like this.
  3. Khalpers

    Khalpers Chirping

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    Thanks! I was reading through your thread and wondering if maybe my hen also needs calcium (in her water if that’s a thing?) She still hadn’t eaten anything when we brought her in for the night, but maybe tomorrow she’ll perk up. How did you get yours to take calcium and D3? I’m glad she’s feeling better!

    That’s such a great idea about the tuna can and oyster shell. Thanks a lot!
     
  4. RumneyRoost

    RumneyRoost Chirping

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    I broke a 650mg human pill in half, held her like a football with her head still and put the pieces in her mouth.

    Fingers crossed for your girl! It's good that you have access to a vet that will treat chickens. My large animal vet will only treat chickens if she sees them regularly like any other animal, since my horse isn't at home I'd be looking at a hefty farm call every time. My small animal vet is just down the road and if I beg they'll give me meds, but they never want to see the chicken themselves. I definitely wouldn't be getting in for an x-ray.

    I've never used liquid calcium. I find giving a pill easier than trying to syringe things into them. You could try crushing it up and mixing it with something she likes (cat food, tuna, small amount of yoghurt, etc.)
     
  5. Khalpers

    Khalpers Chirping

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    Thank you again. She ate a little scrambled egg this morning. I started her on the antibotiocs (dissolved in water). She looks alert but is withdrawn. I’ve seem people post about hens getting depressed when separated from the flock. She can see them in their run now. Thanks so much for the suggestions. She’s a sweet girl.
     
  6. Virginia and James

    Virginia and James Songster

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    Depression could be a thing. Calcium in Tums (yup, the antacid) may work.
    Try wetting down her food if she's not interested in it, make it into more of a paste? Electrolytes in the water, but also offer clean water as well.
    Hmm.
    Following for progress and more ideas. Good luck, honey!
     
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  7. Khalpers

    Khalpers Chirping

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    Update: Still waiting on test results for the culture. She ate a little scrambled eggs and yogurt yesterday. A few mealworms this morning. She’s pooping a lot but only a tiny bit at a time. It’s greenish yellow, brown and white and sort of slimey. I still need to get out to the store and get some electrolyte powder. I’ve read others adding Gatorade to the water. Anyone recommend that? It’s full of sugar, but I think they make a sugar free one.
     
  8. Melissa97

    Melissa97 In the Brooder

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    Hi, I wonder why youre vet whould test for mg? , as she has a laying issue? And I've never heard of mycoplazma being tested with a fecal sample? I am also wondering why you're vet whould give antibiotics for a resperatory issue? I think she needs a antibiotic that is meant to treat peritonitis like baytril and clavamox and some metacam for pain and inflamation. I think you should tell you're vet that this is the wrong course of treatment asap!. Do any of you're birds even have a resperatory issue? Her poop to me indicates an infection is brewing because of the egg breaking inside her, she needs the right treatment asap!
     
  9. Khalpers

    Khalpers Chirping

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    Hi! Thanks so much. I have been wondering too why she's being treated for respiratory because neither she nor the other birds is showing any signs of respiratory distress. (Sorry to be unclear; they took a throat culture to test for mycoplasma, not a fecal sample.) I'm going to give them a call to make that suggestion. Thank you!
     
    Texas Kiki likes this.
  10. Melissa97

    Melissa97 In the Brooder

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    No problem! , this exact same thing happened to one of my hens (shelless egg broken inside of her vent) and she was also misdiagnosed and I almost lost her because of it so I know what you're going thru. I asked a avian expert on just answer for help as my vet was saying that there was nothing they could do as they said she had cancer of the liver!, and I just didint buy it as it made no sense to me how they came up with that diagnosis so I demanded the antibiotics that the avian vet recomended on just answer and she got better and made a full recovery!. She also had the poop you discribe but she had a bit of blood mixed in there too as my hens infection was even more advanced. The avian expert from just answer told me to tell my vet to put her on a both baytril and clavamox (together) as with thease types of infection they need more than one antibiotic and very agressive treatment (she was on this for almost 2 months!!) or it is liable to come back. And make sure they give you metacam for pain and inflamation which will help her recovery a lot as she'll eat and drink more and be more comfortable. Please act fast as thease infection can get out of hand very quickly. Also if you wanted to give her a break from laying eggs you could ask you're vet to implant a suprelorin/ deslorelin implant into her and she will stop laying for 6 or so months and then if she continues to produce shelless eggs then you could continue with the implants for the rest of her life like I've been, my hen has been on them since she was 2 and she is now 6 and will be 7 this october so they work great and you don't have to worry about anymore eggs again!. They need to be repeated every 6 months or so and it's like microchipping a dog it's just a quick needle under the skin between the shoulders or into the brest muscle to insert the small implant so not invasive at all.
     
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