Brooder house

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by indigo flats, Feb 15, 2017.

  1. indigo flats

    indigo flats Chillin' With My Peeps

    262
    5
    56
    Jan 29, 2017
    Elgin South Carolina
    I have a small pigeon loft that I have converted to a closed building that I want to use as a brooder house for both turkeys and chickens. It is draft free but not insulated I am going to close off one end with card board to confine poults or chicks to a smaller space 6 feet by 2 feet and use a light bulb as a heat source. The light will be just up above the floor high enough for the poults to walk under and I will have wood chips as litter on the floor with paper towels on top to keep poults/chicks from eating the litter. Will water and feed in the 2 by 6 area for a couple weeks then give freedom inside. Will this work?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,727
    4,427
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    Should work. Your light will probably be set a bit higher, usually mine is about 2 feet away initially which will give me about 90-95 directly under the bulb for turkeys and I will adjust it to 85-90 for chicks. I use a thermometer to set my initial temperature, than adjust based on behaviors. I rise it weekly to drop by 5 degrees until the brooder temperature is the same taste ambient temperature.

    Crowding under the light they are too cool, spread way away from the light too hot.

    I use paper towels on top of the pine shaving for the first week for traction and to get them eating. I use glass rock to attract them to peck which I put in the feeder and waterer. For both I will put a teaspoon of brown sugar to a quart of water for quick energy for the first day or two, especially for shipped chicked. Poults may need for you to show them the feed by pecking at it for the first few days. Chicks usually will feed better and quicker than poults, so watch and make sure the poults eat and drink.

    If hatching than they usually won't eat for a day or two as they absorb the yolk just before hatching for food.

    Both species will usually become very active and ready for more room after the first week or two.
     
  3. indigo flats

    indigo flats Chillin' With My Peeps

    262
    5
    56
    Jan 29, 2017
    Elgin South Carolina
    Can you recommend a light wattage?
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,727
    4,427
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    I always use a 125 watt. I don't like the 250 as they get too hot. Make sure your lamp has a ceramic socket as plastic ones can melt. Many recommend a red bulb but I haven't had troubles with pecking with a white bulb and think if they are pecking than they need more room and things to do.
     
  5. indigo flats

    indigo flats Chillin' With My Peeps

    262
    5
    56
    Jan 29, 2017
    Elgin South Carolina
    How far above the floor should I monitor the temperature that the light is given off. I am sure the rest of the brooder house will be a little chilly.
     
  6. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

    3,625
    1,810
    291
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    The temperature has to be measured at the bedding level. If you monitor the air temperature, the temperature will be far too high.
     
  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,727
    4,427
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    I put my thermometer straight on the floor of my brooder on top of the bedding.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by