Brooder size questions, and

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Shawnee_b, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Shawnee_b

    Shawnee_b Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 28, 2011
    So Central Kentucky
    Time for my own peeps and keets. While friends offer me full grown chickens (and plenty eggs) I wish to raise some of my own choice and breed. The guineas mostly for tick control!

    I was thinking on 6'L x 3'W x 2"H with a divider down the middle that can be removed as they grow, so as little ones they have a tighter quarters and don't get lost! Is that over kill for 25 peeps or 30 keets later? Maybe too hard to keep warm? I would like them in there until they are feathered enough for an outside coop, run and later free-range. If too large what would work for 25-30?

    Raised off the deck with hardware cloth bottom but cardboard and shavings until larger?

    I will be able to knock it down when not in use. I find common house door hinges work well on corners, pull the pins and take it down.

    Maybe a question for the guinea section but; With the guineas being a bit more aggressive is raising the chickens first them the guineas a good idea so the guineas learn a bit while smaller?

    I did read in the guinea section too, like the idea of chickens raising keets too.

    Thank you in advance for answers.
     
  2. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 11, 2011
    Tn
    I've never had guineas, so I can't help you there. With a brooder, bigger is better, in my opinion. Chicks grow FAST! My brooder is 4ft L x 2.5ft W x 2.5ft T, or something like that. Right now its housing 23 3 week old chicks. Its getting a little cramped in there. Half of those chicks will be sold or processed, so pretty soon I'll separate them to the crate of doom to finish growing out so my pullets can have the extra room in the hutch. I also don't see a problem with keeping it warm. The whole brooder doesn't need to be kept at 90°, just an area big enough for a them to warm up. When I set my chicks up in my outside hutch, the temp outside was in the 30s. The area under the heat lamps was reading about 87° and the rest of the hutch was somewhere between 40 and 50. They've feathered out fast being in the cooler temps. I also like to leave my brooder up all year. I've used it as a hospital, quarantine, for my broody hens and their chicks, and even for separating specific birds for breeding. Good luck!
     
  3. Shawnee_b

    Shawnee_b Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 28, 2011
    So Central Kentucky
    Thank you. That's helpful info for me. I like that idea of being up year round for other uses too. I hope it doesn't get too crowded but it is a bit larger floor area than the one you mention so it may be fine. Looking for a warming trend here too! I don't intend (but intentions can change) on selling/processing any of the first 25 or of the 30 keats but possibly some meat birds later.
     

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