Brooder size.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by n3kms, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. n3kms

    n3kms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How many Australorp chicks can you raise in a 44"x44"x24"h brooder for the entire time they need a brooder? [​IMG]
     
  2. Gma

    Gma Out Of The Brooder

    Hi! I am pretty new at this too but I just moved my 5 week old chicks out of a brooder that allowed them 2/3 of a sq ft each and your 12 chicks would have above 1 sq ft each in your space. My brooder was getting a little crowded the last few days but I had no picking or cannabalism problems. They are all happy and healthy in their new home.

    Good luck with your venture, I was not prepared to like my chicks as much as I do, they become addictive! Beware![​IMG]
     
  3. Rustic Chicken

    Rustic Chicken Out Of The Brooder

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    That would give you around 13 total sqft. I'm not an expert, but from everything I have read you really want 2 sqft/chick so I don't think you would want more than 6-7 in that brooder long term. Also, from recent experience, you may want to put some type of "lid" on the brooder. Our guys are just over 4 weeks old and they can easily fly the coop. Here is picture of our brooder with the lid that we could flip down when the got big enough to plan their great escape. It has worked out great.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. jaj121159

    jaj121159 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have read .3 sq. ft. for the first few weeks, then .6 until 8 weeks old. Two sq. ft. just seems too high and it's a number some people place on coop square footage. To brood 10 chicks you would need 20 sq. ft. I brooded 15 Cornish x's for three weeks in a large rubber-maid tote.
     
  5. kipper

    kipper Chillin' With My Peeps

    They grow REALLY FAST, so I would say no more than 10. But, with it being Summer, you may be able to put them out earlier depending on your climate and your chicken house. We usually keep ours in the brooder for 6 weeks, but this time of year we do more like 4 weeks and put them in their house with a light for warmth when needed.

    Enjoy your babies![​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  6. n3kms

    n3kms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info.
    I do plan on a lid. I don't plan to get chicks till the spring so it will still be a bit cool at first (March in Tennessee). I am not currently planning on electricity in the coop but I could get a long extension cord.
    I guess I am asking questions a bit early but I am at home with a broken wrist. It's frustrating to not be able to do any two handed things. Reading on this website is good, typing can be slow though. As I read what others are writing I'm learning a bunch. I also seem to come up with more questions. This is the box I have? Do you think I would need to cut a hole in one side and replace with wire to aid ventilation? Is it better for them to be able to see out?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Rustic Chicken

    Rustic Chicken Out Of The Brooder

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    I think the brooder looks great! I am not sure that side ventilation is necessary (and in fact it may be better not to have it because of drafts...Our brooder is housed in the garage so drafts were not a concern.). I would just be sure the lid has some kind of a mesh/wire netting for great ventilation. Feel better!
     
  8. n3kms

    n3kms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks. It will be going in the garage too when the time comes. Plan to make a lid. Got the box, actually two of them, for 20 dollars each. thought that was a good deal. When I saw them advertised on craig's list my first thought is that it would make a perfect brooder.
     

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