Broodie, again? She has only been laying a month since her winter break.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by eggocentric, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. eggocentric

    eggocentric Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 3, 2011
    Grants Pass, Oregon
    I hope someone can advise me. The larger of the two chickens in my avatar is starting to get broodie again. She didn't lay all winter because I didn't have the coop set up right to give them the light they needed. She has only been laying again for a month.
    Is she going to be in a permanent state of "brood"? She is only a year old. She laid last year for about a month then went broodie, then molt. Not getting much egg production this way.

    Is this the nature of her breed? Or did I just get lucky?
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Both. Cochins are known for broodiness, which is why people who like to hatch a lot generally keep either silkies or cochins in their flocks. Of course some are more broody than others. My silkies are that way...they lay for a month and then go broody for a month, on and off.
    If you're wanting reliable eggs, go for a layer breed...rocks, australorps, wyandottes, reds...birds like that. Both d'uccles (if that's you're smaller bird) and cochins are more ornamental/pet than anything else - both are lovely breeds though.
     
  3. eggocentric

    eggocentric Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 3, 2011
    Grants Pass, Oregon
    Thank you. Not the answer I was hoping for. I may have to find a way to get another hen or two. The girls are fun to have around but the point was to have eggs. My coop is small so I have a problem to solve. 4 hens will really push the limits of space.

    Thank you for your help
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    I second that it is the "nature of the breed'. Cochins and silkies are known for their mothering instincts/abilities. If eggs are your primary goal, get some sex links or leghorns. Or buy some fertile eggs for your broody, knowing that you will have approximately 50% cockerels in any chicks that you hatch.
     
  5. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cochins are pretty, but pretty useless for eggs :p. You're lucky she didn't decide to skip laying her first egg in favor for brooding a month, like my friend's cochins do all the time.

    If you are strapped for space, put her on Craigslist for 10 dollars. Cochins are like candy to most hobbyists. I'd be surprised if you didn't sell her within 2 days.
     
  6. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    I agree, many like the cute, little, fluffy, feather footed breeds just as lawn ornaments/pets (I have several eye candy breeds in my flock). D'uccles are horrible winter layers (at least in my experience), so you won't get much from her during the colder months either. You might opt to sell/rehome both of those lovely girls and bring in 2 or 3 laying breeds. Many laying breeds are known for being friendly and docile. Because both those breeds are fairly passive, I'd be wary of bringing in two layers if it'd make space tight because I'd worry about these two getting picked on...unless you were bringing in two really young pullets. You might just want to start over though, unless these have become your pets. Or use this as an excuse to get a new, bigger coop!!! LOL


     
  7. eggocentric

    eggocentric Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 3, 2011
    Grants Pass, Oregon
    Thank you so much for responding to my plea.
    1. Raising babies is not an option. (many reasons, space, time, etc)
    2. Bigger coop is not an option due to space limits. Major landscaping project would be require for a larger coop. Besides, there are only two of us to use the eggs.

    I may have to live with having pets instead of egg layers. They are cute but I was looking for eggs. :(

    Thank you all for the information. I learn something new every time I search the BackYard Chicken page.
     

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