broody chinese goose?

Discussion in 'Geese' started by bufforp89, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. bufforp89

    bufforp89 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2009
    Chenango Forks NY
    I thought that chinese geese didnt go broody? Has anyone ever had one that has?? I think I do, mine has been sitting on eggs for 2 days now. I have to figure out a way to keep the ducks from harassing her but I am thinking about letting her hatch. Any imput??
     
  2. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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  3. protodon

    protodon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nottingham,PA
    I agree about how broody they are. I have had 2 out of 5 go broody in the past 2 years. Once they start it's so hard to get them to stop. They end up getting all dirty and losing a lot of weight. And they will even go broody way after their laying season just by finding some chicken eggs to lay on. But I still have had no luck having one hatch any eggs for me.
     
  4. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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    You are so right!

    I would drag mine off the nest and carry them to the far end of the field and head back to take their eggs. They usually beat me back to the barn.

    They get off the nest when they are darn good and ready, that's for sure. Mine made me feel like a lowlife when I took the eggs so I finally gave them some golf balls.
     
  5. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    I thought Chinese geese were the least broody. I'm thinking I read Lou Horton say something to the effect, "even a chinese goose can go broody." I understood that to mean that though they can, it's not something you can count on like some other sorts. I'll see if I can find the reference.
     
  6. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    I found it:

    "Parental Instincts
    Certainly geese deserve high marks in terms of their desire and ability to be good parents when given the opportunity to do. Most breeds of geese will incubate their own eggs successfully (Chinas perhaps being the exception) If they are given adequate protections from predators, most can also be counted on to raise their broods themselves. I have even seen lone individuals and pairs consisting of two members of the same sex raise groups of goslings and exhibit the behavior of devoted parents. The fact that they did not hatch the goslings themselves does not seem to matter. Even Chinas do not lack the desire to raise goslings. They simply possess a nervous disposition that makes it difficult for them to stay the whole course in terms of the incubation period (27-28 days) and they often will continue filling a nest with eggs long after the number of eggs would make it impossible for a single female to cover them. If one carefully manages the number of eggs a given female is allowed to incubate and provides a secluded and secure nesting site, even some Chinas are capable of successfully hatching goslings. On average, older birds are more likely to be successful than young ones."


    Taken from:
    Understanding the Behavior of Domestic Geese written by Lou Horton
    http://www.acornhollowbantams.com/about_geese.cfm?id=34
     
  7. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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    That's interesting. Dave Holderread says quite the opposite.

    I currently have a broody sebbie in the middle of winter. [​IMG]
     
  8. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Now you have me running to Dave's book... brb [​IMG]
     
  9. HorseFeatherz NV

    HorseFeatherz NV Eggink Chickens

    Both of my Chinese girls went broody last year - raised 4 goslings between the 4 adults. [​IMG] the noise!




    ETA: picture taken 8/19/2009 - Lucy Goosy and Shy China with gosling

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2010
  10. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    25 minutes later...

    Using the index and reading every entry on chinese geese by Dave Holderread in "The Book of Geese a Complete Guide to Raising the Home Flock," he does not say quite the opposite, at least in his book. He's not as adamant as Lou Horton, but Dave writes, "Geese of most breeds are devoted parents, especially when two years or older. However, some Chinese and most Dewlap Toulouse cannot be depended upon for parental duties." In the entry related to Chinese, he states they are one of the most prolific egg layers, but says nothing about their parenting skills.

    It sounds like they are a bit more like some domestic ducks. They can, but it's not guaranteed.
     

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