Broody hen not keeping eggs warm!

Ruby Mia

Songster
6 Years
Feb 6, 2013
283
22
108
England
My hen pip is hatching some eggs, but when I took out the eggs that she's not hatching which she has been on all day, they were not warm. she has been broody for almost two weeks of me constantly taking her and the eggs out, because I didn't want to deal with mix breed roos if we got any, but we have some pure breed eggs now. she has pecked all her belly feathers out and last week her belly was really warm, but doesn't seem to be any more. will the chicks still hatch, will I have to get a heat lamp?
 

bobbi-j

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Mar 15, 2010
14,342
26,954
982
On the MN prairie.
Just let her do her job. I don't generally mess with my broodies. I make sure they have food and water available and let them do what they were created to do.
 
Last edited:

Mrdiegs

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 29, 2014
15
0
22
I'm new to this so how do you get a broody hen does it just choose or is it a certain type?
 

bobbi-j

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Mar 15, 2010
14,342
26,954
982
On the MN prairie.
I'm new to this so how do you get a broody hen does it just choose or is it a certain type?


A broody hen is one who's hormones have kicked in and told her that it's time to hatch some eggs. Some breeds are more prone to go broody than others, and is seems to be the general opinion that hatchery birds are less likely to go broody than heritage birds. You'll know you have a broody when you go to collect eggs from under her and she puffs up and growls at you, maybe trying to peck you. She'll be all flattened out yet fluffed up on the nest and will give
you the good ol' stinkeye when you go near her.







Two of last year's broodies. The one in the bottom picture was bound and determined to nest in that particular box. I tried moving her 3 times before I finally let her have her way.
 

Mrdiegs

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 29, 2014
15
0
22
:welcome A broody hen is one who's hormones have kicked in and told her that it's time to hatch some eggs. Some breeds are more prone to go broody than others, and is seems to be the general opinion that hatchery birds are less likely to go broody than heritage birds. You'll know you have a broody when you go to collect eggs from under her and she puffs up and growls at you, maybe trying to peck you. She'll be all flattened out yet fluffed up on the nest and will give you the good ol' stinkeye when you go near her. Two of last year's broodies. The one in the bottom picture was bound and determined to nest in that particular box. I tried moving her 3 times before I finally let her have her way.
Thanks Bobbi-j
 
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