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broody hens

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by simeys chooks, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. simeys chooks

    simeys chooks New Egg

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    Aug 20, 2007
    tasmania
    hi all im new to this. i have had chickens for 2 years now about 15 isa browns and im just wondering if there is anyway to get my hens broody cos they have never gone in the 2 years ive had them.they are 3 years old now. can any one please help ???
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  2. Rafter 7 Paint Horses

    Rafter 7 Paint Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    East Texas
    I don't know about the isa browns as far as if they tend to be broody or not. I do know that all hens will go broody when they want to & not when you want them to.

    Since you have had these for that amount of time & they haven't gone broody, they may not be the motherly type.
    Maybe you could put some of your isa brown eggs under a different breed of hen that like to brood chicks.

    Silkies & Cochins make great mothers, & go broody often.


    Jean
     
  3. simeys chooks

    simeys chooks New Egg

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    7
    Aug 20, 2007
    tasmania
    ok thanks jean:)
     
  4. bassfishrman

    bassfishrman Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 16, 2007
    I have some bantam hens and if I leave 2 or 3 eggs in a nest for more than a day, one of them will surely begin to sit on them.

    When they do this, I usually exchange the eggs for about 5 golf balls and watch them for a few days. If them continue to set on the golf balls, I will put some fertile eggs I have collected over a couple of days and let them go at it.

    I have found out through experience that the breeds have much to do with broodiness. Most bantams I have had are broody ALOT. Of course, you probably already know, but certain breeds such as Rhode Island Reds never go broody.
     

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