Broody Quail - College Project

Discussion in 'Quail' started by JackBaker, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. JackBaker

    JackBaker Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi
    My name is Jack and I was wondering if people would be able to help me? I'm currently in college studying animal management and am in my final year. I have to do a year long project of my choice and have chosen to do a study on What Influences Japanese Coturnix Quail to go Broody in Captivity?I have had a Japanese quail hen of my own going broody also and am trying to see if I can recreate it but also to see what caused her to do it in the first place. I already have my suspicions but need other people's experiences and idea to make up my project. If you would be willing to partake in my project please let me know as it would be greatly appreciated. Also, if you wouldn't mind sending me your email address I could then email you an attachment of my questions and you could fill it in for me and email it me back.
    Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you.
     
  2. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have any experience with quails.But i do know that fake eggs in the nesting box highly encourages them to go broody.


    Welcome to BYC![​IMG]
     
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  3. MageofMist

    MageofMist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They like quiet, safe and dark-ish spots to make their nests to incubate eggs in, which is why we put in a cardboard box for them to nest in. My broody hen didn't show much interest in her eggs until she had a bunch in the nest box after I stopped taking the eggs out of the cage, in which she started popping in and out of randomly until going broody for serious. My quails are Chinese Painted quails also known as King or Button quails, but I imagine it isn't that different to Japanese Quails when it comes to getting them broody.

    Edit: Also, provide a surplus of nesting material, a big mound of dry grass/hay, that will entice them to start nesting and later on possibly go broody. You can also get creative, shredding up tissue if your bird shows no interest in the hay, as Speckles only started nesting after I put in some shredded tissue as an experiment.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    My, sadly now late, broody hen Fluffy and her eggs.
    Her sister, Speckles, isn't all that interested in brooding, but she has been showing some signs in making a nest in the corner with her mate, Rex, and occasionally sitting on a single egg she laid in it, but not really setting on it for serious.

    The dummy egg thing could also work, and have less chance of eggs exploding under the hen due to them being too old, but I hadn't had any eggs explode under my hen even though there was a few rather old ones in there. I was thinking on buying some canary dummy eggs off Amazon to try and entice them to go broody if me leaving the eggs in the box didn't work.

    Edit: Also Speckles' and Rex's tissue cave nest:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  4. Bug n Flock

    Bug n Flock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey there fellow student! I'm always willing to help out in the name of education and or science.

    I keep Coturnix coturnix and Coturnix chinensis. None of my girls have gone fully broody, but my kings have started broody behavior and quit a few times. I don't have anything in their pen to encourage broodiness, but I could try adding stuff. My kings I keep in a very unorthodox setup and frankly I am pretty suprised I never had to switch it up. I have my birds in a two level wire cage in a one roo to three hen ratio, AND they have a pair of society finches as roommates. No fighting has ever been observed and my hens lay every day. The roo services all three girls, and the finches are friends with the quail and they all hang out together. Very odd.

    My coturnix quail have never gone broody, but are in a more traditional setup. You can email me at [email protected] I'd be more than happy to help out any way I can, even by rearranging pens etc. And I have a BUNCH of babies of both species growing out and almost ready to be paired up and penned out so can set up fresh groups. :)
     
  5. DK newbie

    DK newbie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I never actually had coturnix (I only have button quail and they seem to go broody quite a lot easier - mine do it all the time), so I can't help with first hand experiences. But I've been reading this forum for almost 2 years I think, and during that time I've read quite a few stories of broody coturnix quail. You'd probably be better of searching for and reading those stories yourself, but to sum op the things I've noticed about those stories:
    Most of the broody coturnix quail have lived in aviaries (or greenhouse-like structures). 1 or 2 in ground pens (like rabbit hutches or similar) or pens with a solid floor just above ground height. I only specifically remember one which lived in a raised pen with - as far as I recall - a wire floor. I believe that this cage had some kind of semi solid floor (like cardboard or something) where the quail had its nest and I'm not sure it actually managed to hatch chicks. Several of them had very few cage mates - perhaps one male and one female friend. In one instance I think the male had just been removed leaving only a few females in the enclosure, after which one female went broody. The majority of them had some kind of semi-cover in the spot they made their nest - hay, plants, the nest was inside a bucket, a corner on two sides and a box or something on the third.
     
  6. JaeG

    JaeG Overrun With Chickens

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    https://holistic-hen.blogspot.co.nz/

    This has some interesting articles on it including documenting her own broody quail. Good luck with your studies. I know that Chinese Button quail quickly lose the instinct to brood their own eggs if artificially raised and the Japanese quail has been artificially raised for quite some time now so it's no wonder it's such a rarity to have one who's instincts are still strong enough to lead them to brood and raise their own chicks.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. JackBaker

    JackBaker Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you, all information is welcomed :). I have looked at some forums and taken some information but I need people to fill out a questionnaire for me as part of my research. If you know of anyone who has had broody Japanese quail please send them my way. [​IMG]
     
  8. JackBaker

    JackBaker Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you I have already contacted the owner of this blog, and she has helped in my research. I know and do agree, which is why I am currently trying to discover why certain hens do go broody.
     
  9. JaeG

    JaeG Overrun With Chickens

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    Do share any findings please. I for one would rather hatch eggs the natural way! Good luck.
     
  10. crimsonmama

    crimsonmama Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi! I think I have a broody coturnix quail. From all I've read it is supposed to be rare so I don't know if she will fully complete the process yet. Basically I got a pair of quail about two months ago. Turned out they were male and female. I thought I was getting two female. Was from a private seller and from an aviary outdoors which also housed breeding budgies and finches. I had them indoors for a week or so before moving them outside into a low aviavy. The female wasn't interested in the males advances. At Xmas my mum visited with her dogs and they scared the quails before I covered them and the male jumped and cut his head on the mesh. I was worried about infection so after my mum left I brought the quails indoors. They are currently living in a section of my kitchen floor! I have laid newspaper and a sand box and a box (open top) with hay. My female laid her first egg and they are regularly mating. I know it is due to being indoors, having more light as it is winter here. The males head is fine but it's been icy out so I have kept them indoors for warmth too. The first egg my quail laid in the hay I removed and added to my incubater as I have some mailed eggs to try to hatch. I felt bad taking her egg. I decided to see what she did if I didn't take any more. She just laid her 7th egg in the nest tonight and is now starting to sit on them.
    The last week of laying I have noticed the behaviour of the male has been very good. He has sat on the eggs and appears to guard them and I've seen him adjusting the hay into more nest shape. He also sits over the female guarding her when she is laying an egg. They both check the eggs frequently esp is I have been close changing food or water bowls. The females appears to count the eggs tapping each with her beak when checking they are still there. So far no aggression to the male. Tonight she is doing the flattening out over the eggs thing but has got up for food/rest.
    If I hadn't read that coturnix rarely hatch their own eggs I would say they are showing very lead indications of pair bonding and breeding.
    It remains to be seen if she continues to sit and if she successfully hatches the eggs.
    I like to think they are happy and that's why they (might) be brooding.
    Food they have a game bird feed, chick feed, oyster shells, grit, meal worms and apples. The female has enjoyed a boiled chicken egg once too.
     

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