Brown Rose comb Leghorn rooster crossed with a Speckled Sussex hen

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by chiklee, Mar 27, 2015.

  1. chiklee

    chiklee Chillin' With My Peeps

    If i crossed a Brown RC Leghorn rooster with a Speckled Sussex hen....What am I looking at ? Will it breed true in the first or second generation ? What happens to egg production? Can it also be "Auto sexing"? Or will i have to keep using the Br.RC. Leghorn rooster on the Speckled Sussex hen/ crosses ?Can this "mix/cross" ever breed true ?And here's the tricky part what about the "rose combs" Will they show up in succeeding generations? Thanks for any help you can be in this matter
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    I don’t know what you mean by “breed true”.

    The rose comb is dominant so the first generation of that cross will have a rose comb.

    The speckling is recessive so the first generation of that cross will not show any speckling.

    If you breed the offspring of your cross to each other, some will have single combs but most should have rose. This assumes your olriginal rose combed rooster is pure for the rose comb to start with. Some of the second generation will have speckling but most will not.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    You'll have mixed breed birds that combine characteristics of both parent breeds. Offspring will lay less than the Leghorn parent but more than the Sussex. Size will be in between. Agree your speckling is recessive so you're going to get some type of red/mahogany coloring, maybe some black breasted red.
     
  4. chiklee

    chiklee Chillin' With My Peeps

    By true I mean will they continue to show results of the "cross" or will they throw back to either breed. So that can I use the roosters of this "cross" to continue this line ? On a different note what if I put the RC leghorn rooster back on the cross what would happen ? That being whatever that comes out to......then what if i put on these "cross" roosters back on the RC leghorn hens...I trying to figure out if I can maintain either line with a RC leghorn rooster and or a crossbreed rooster.. To boil it down already knowing that both of these types of roosters are dedicated fighters I can only keep one maybe two on the property... I'm trying to keep the RC leghorn line separate and don't mind stepping on the sussex line, we no longer have a sussex rooster. Is that confusing enough ?
     
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'm not sure I understand your goal. Mixing breeds will give you characteristics of both breeds. Breeding an f1 back to a purebred bird will still give you a mixed breed bird, but a heavier emphasis on the 75 percent breed.

    Why are you breeding aggressive roosters? The world's full of good temperament birds.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    When you cross specific color and breed of purebred chickens you can get some fairly predictable results especially in color and pattern, but also in many other traits. They will be a combination of the traits of their parents.

    When you cross the results of the initial cross, the genes are distributed randomly. There are a tremendous number of genes involved. It just depends on how those genes come together. They may be a lot like one of the grandparents, maybe pretty similar to their parents, or they may be quite a bit different.

    As Rachel said, if you cross one of those crosses back to one of their parents that specific parent’s influence will be enhanced. That does not mean they will be like that parent, they can still be a lot different. It just depends on how those random genes come together.

    If you cross a Leghorn/Sussex cockerel back to the Sussex hens, the Sussex traits will be enhanced, but they will not be Sussex. They will still be a cross.
     
  7. chiklee

    chiklee Chillin' With My Peeps

    First off as a "homesteader", I've spent near 40 years doing what everybody else does with chickens... It was either some kind of dual-purpose breed or a mixed flock of Heinz 57's,trying to breed the goods ones with a good rooster under very uncontrolled conditions, not really ever getting what I want out of it, some were better layers some were better meat and some were better setters.So some 15 years ago I discovered the wonderful world of meat rabbits, I decided that much easier to clean 10 rabbits than 3 chickens, now i no longer need to play "the dual-purpose chicken game" I've had some success with opening up the gene pool when I mixed RIR (hens) with a RIR Bantam (rooster) resulting in a lot of different size eggs with some hens that would set,but they kept getting smaller as time went on, not good for meat. Here's another one I wasted my time with, thinking i could get the best of both worlds Jersey Giants and the only good thing I have to say about them is they set and lay large/medium egg thru the winter, and there are plenty of other poultry disasters I've had in search for the ultimate homestead chicken.Since that time my goals have shifted to rabbits for meat and chickens for eggs.But there is a fly in the ointment there too, My Leghorns even though some lay eggs in the winter they're not the best winter layers either, and mine will never set an egg, So leftover from a previous flock we kept the Sussex hens to supply us with eggs during the winter and to use their ability to set. This is the first time I've tried to keep to 2 separate lines at the same time, each with a job to do instead of the usual poke and hope everyone else does... that's not into a "formal SOP"breeding program. "Pedigree" for the most part means nothing to me production is all that I'm after, breed conformation doesn't matter unless I'm trying to accomplish specific task like I do with rabbits, the best ones I've found were the result of several crossings, never a "pure" breed . enough said, Do you think this leghorn/Sussex cross would have economical merit and practicality? This is a small flock 9 Leghorns and 8 Sussex's and I only have the one rooster (RC Br Leghorn) thinking it would probably easier finding a Sussex one if needed to make this work. I want to keep the Leghorns pure for the most part I like them the way they are and the Sussex or Sussex crosses I don't care about as long as they retain their winter lay and their set ability. What do you think ? I'm know I'm heading down the road less-traveled
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    You might be taking a little different route but that road is pretty well traveled. My flock is a mixed flock. I like to play with genetics some for fun, but I have a red speckled and black speckled flock that lay green eggs, are pretty good at egg laying though I need to work on egg size, and taste really good. You certainly will not find an SOP or pedigree for what I have. If I concentrated more on egg size instead of egg color and chicken color and pattern I’d have that egg size part fixed.

    Since you know what you want, choose your breeding hens from the ones that have the characteristics you want. Over time you will enhance those traits. But the problem is that if you only have a leghorn rooster, over time they will become more and more like the leghorns, eventually even laying white eggs. Egg shell color is probably not of much importance to you but eventually you’ll have to separate the hens to know which are laying pure leghorn eggs.

    I said you will enhance those traits. That’s not true. You’ll maintain those traits longer, but as long as you breed them to a pure leghorn rooster, you will weaken those traits every generation. I don’t know how many generations it will take but eventually you will wind up with all hens having leghorn traits for winter lay and broodiness unless you keep two roosters.
     
  9. chiklee

    chiklee Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks Ridgerunner, I think have a plan.... save a cross breed Sussex rooster every once in while when i want a new batch of Sussex type setter/winter layers. So in the mean time I can sell some of the cross hens with my excess Leghorns.. the crosses should sell well 'cause they'll be pretty good layers and good-looking bird too. Then I'm free to concentrate on improving the Leghorns.I have one more question. What do think could these crosses be "auto-sexing" ? I'll be looking for the difference's in the chicks. I ask because some auto-sexing "breeds" involve both Leghorn and Sussex chickens, but different breeds from the ones i keep, maybe mine don't have this trait. I think from what I've read your red ones do have this trait. Once again thanks
     

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