Brown/Yellow poo quite worried

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by claireschicks, Dec 2, 2013.

  1. claireschicks

    claireschicks Out Of The Brooder

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    This is my chickens poo, I saw one earlier in her coop but then later on I watched her do one. I am quite worried about this as it is very foamy. Any advice?
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    My vet told me that foamy poop is a sign of a protozoal infection, which could mean something like coccidiosis, blackhead, giardia, etc. Do all of the her poops look like that? Many people might say that it's just cecal poop, but I have seen birds with poop like that die and their necropsies confirmed coccidiosis, so that's what I would treat for first.

    Treatment for coccidiosis is Corid or Amprol (amprolium) powder or liquid.
    • Powder dose - 1.5 teaspoons per 1 US gallon for 5-7 days
    • Liquid dose - 2 teaspoons per 1 US gallon for 5-7 days

    More amprolium info here:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818879/updated-corid-and-amprol-amprolium-dosing


    -Kathy
     
  3. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    I agree with kathy. I've always heard foamy poo was a sign of a protozal infection. I second it should be treated for coccidosis. Bloody poo is NOT always present with coccidosis. I would follow kathys instruction and treat with corid.
     
  4. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Yellow foamy droppings are ejected from the caeca and aren't normal. Often, its an indication of Blackhead (histomaniasis) or even birds that get Canker (Trichomoniasis) can have this problem. I'd suggest giving one 250mg metronidazole once a day for 5 days. If the bird is less than 5 lbs, give half the dose.

    Since cecal worms often carry the protozoan which causes Blackhead, you'll want to worm them regularly after metronidazole treatment with Safeguard liquid labeled for goats or Valbazen suspension. Dose is 1/2 cc for standard breeds up to 6 lbs. and 1/4 cc for Bantam breeds. Do it again 10 days later. I worm about every 6 months and it seems sufficient in my area for my environment.

    After a run of medications, it is always a good idea to treat water with vitamin-mineral powder and probiotics for 3-5 days.
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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  6. Phoenixxx

    Phoenixxx Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hmm, I thought these poos were normal, but only because they're sporadic/occasional. Been meaning to search it for ages now (that's how UNconcerned I was about the odd yellow poo) but one of my roos just dropped one reminding me to look it up. So, they're not normal, even when most of the poos are normal, bicolored, solid poos?

    I'll be worming soon, once my order from Molly's comes in.
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    There are two types of poop, regular intestinal poop and cecal poop. The can color can vary, but it shouldn't be foamy. "The poop page" shows poops like yours as normal, but I don't think they are. I'll see if I can post a picture of what I consider a normal cecal poop from one of my chickens.

    -Kathy
     
  8. claireschicks

    claireschicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you, do you think I should take her to the vet? In their coop I haven't seen anymore like this but she does do it quite alot...
     
  9. Tamara119

    Tamara119 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think there's a real possibility that your chicken is just fine. There cannot be a diagnosis made by one picture of poop and no reported symptoms. Does your chicken only have poop like this, or are some of her poops different? Here is the chart to compare them to:
    http://chat.allotment.org/index.php?topic=17568.0%3Cbr%3E%3Cbr%3Ei
    Many ceacal poops look exactly like the photo you posted. A foamy poop seems to be puffier. If she has darker, more solid poops as well, then the photo is probably just a ceacal poop.
    Is your chicken acting normally? How old is your chicken? Coccidiosis is rare in adult chickens, and in chicks there are obvious symptoms like wings drooping.
    Before dosing your chicken with anything I think it would be best to post any other symptoms (lethargy, lack of appetite, drooping wings, drooping head, tilted head, etc) that you've noticed so that a diagnosis isn't just a shot in the dark.
     
  10. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    That's just it. If the droppings are often normal and the bird is active with a good appetite, don't be worried. Keeping a good broad spectrum wormer like Safe guard or Valbazen on hand is wise. The same with Corid, Sulfadimethoxine, some Amoxicillin or Cephalexin caps, a pack of Neomycin and Chlortetracycline powder, an effective broad spectrum injectible like enrofloxacin (Baytril) being kept in the cabinet. It is better to have those items than not, and even if they expire and you end up throwing some out, you are prepared if problems arise. Birds drink less in the Winter and stress can be put upon birds during weather extremes. That is why I regularly supplement water with Vitamin-mineral and probiotic dispersible powder at least 3 days a week to keep the immune system strong. I've seen how this benefits birds over the years. Keeping coop environments dry and well ventilated with the absence of drafts makes a big difference too. The yard outside the coop should drain well and not hold areas of stagnant water in between rains.
     

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