Bubbles in Eyes, raspy, mucus, sneezing Help with Treatment PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sally Sunshine, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    I did research but found so many opinions I am going batty!

    I have 15+/- LF mixed flock of 10 month old LF hens & roos with some weird raspy cackeling


    Question....
    do I give them all tylan or should I give the sulmet in the water for 5 days? I only have those meds on hand! I am thinking going directly to the tylan???




    This is my plan....

    tylan 50 injectable, but I will give orally.
    Dosage is 1/2cc for standard size birds for 5 days, 1/4cc for smaller birds for 5 days. You should see improvement by the 3rd or 4th day....continue and include the 5th day dosing. You can pull up the amount needed and squirt it onto a piece of bread and feed it to her. Make sure to use only the amount of bread she will eat so that she gets the entire dose. The reason you administer for 5 days is because it takes longer to absorb into their system, alot is excreted, not like injecting once a day for 3 days where it goes directly into the respiratory system. or Pull the wattles down and the mouth will open, then squirt the liquid in the mouth. Then quickly release the wattles so the bird can swallow the liquid on her own without aspirating. She may struggle abit before you dose her but will tire, hang on to the wattles and dont let go.


    SHOULD I do the ACV or BLEACH in this case?
    BLEACH ~ "2 cups bleach to 1 gal. water and then add in a 1 gal. water bucket 1 oz of the mix and water all for at least 24 hours. It's a very dilute bleach solution - probably to reduce transmission of an infectious agent through the shared waterers. Like putting Oxine is the waterers, which some people do all of the time."


    ACV~ Give your birds an astringent solution at the rate of four teaspoons of Apple Cider Vinegar to each gallon of water (but never in galvanized metal containers). The tannin in ACV will reduce the viscosity of mucus, and 'cuts through' the coatings in the mouth, throat and intestines, improving the uptake of nutrients/vitamins, and is useful in the treatment of any respiratory disease, as it helps them to expel the mucus from their system. It also reduces the presence of botulism, and is the only effective treatment for the toxin it produces. The target pH is 5~6, or slightly acidic, which also creates a hostile environment for internal parasites ... all that goodness, and for quite literally pennies per gallon ~;-)"


    And can I try this along too or don’t bother?
    "Crushed ( 7) 1000 mg vitamin c tablets.(one for each chicken) added two to three tablespoons of cinnamon to the powder and mixed it in feed."




    http://www.afn.org/~poultry/newsletr/1996/psep96.pdf
    Chicken
    Medications
    by Dr. James Barton and Clarence Gillihan
    (excerpt)
    ".....Bacterial Diseases:
    Purchase a bottle of Tylan 50 and several 3cc
    syringes with 25 to 30 gauge 1/2" needles. Give your hen 1 to 1 1/2 cc. of Tylan under the skin of the neck .........Continue daily injections for three days but not more than five. Withdrawal time is one month. Tylan does not have much activity against coccidia, but it is very good against Mycoplasma bacteria which is responsible for some respiratory diseases.

    To inject Tylan 50, pull the hens feathers back
    to reveal the skin on base of the the neck on her back. Lift the skin up and insert the needle gentlty but firmly into the skin just far enough to allow the Tylan to be injected. You will be able to feel it. Be careful that you do not inject yourself. Make certain that you do not push the needle through the skin and out again not injecting at all................

    Because Tylan is so powerful, it is recommended
    that you purchase some Beneficial Bird Bacteria
    and feed it to your chicken after she recovers.
    Tylan wipes out all the benficial bacteria that is normally present in a chickens digestive system.

    Also, Tylan can kill skin cells near the site of the injection so you should not use anything stronger than Tylan 50 - a stronger variety, Tylan-200 is also available at your local feed store, but this will likely do more harm than good.

    When purchasing syringes, get them from a
    local drug store. The 'human' grade needles are a little sharper than the vetrinary grade. The cost is about the same and your hen will thank you...."





     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
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  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    You are possibly dealing with a respiratory disease in your flock. It's possible it couldve been introduced by wild birds. You can treat chickens for respiratory diseases with all kinds of medicines and antibiotics, but they are never cured of the disease. Some diseases are virusus and not treatable. They may look normal one day, then the next day they are showing symptoms and stress usually sets off symptoms. If you decide to treat and not cull, you will have to maintain a closed flock; no new birds in, none out, and no selling or giving away eggs to be hatched.
    Here's a link to respiratory diseases in poultry:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    I recommend that your cull your sickest bird and send it off to have a necropsy performed to find out what you're dealing with. Contact your local extension office or state agriculture department and find out how to go about doing this.
    I suspect you are dealing with mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG.) Other possibilities are infectious coryza, maybe infectious bronchitis (IB.) You can read about those diseases in the link I provided above.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
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  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Ok, here's what I did when we had an outbreak of infectious bronchitis. We treated all the birds with antibiotic's as soon as they started showing symptoms. I had taken a couple of them to a vet and he gave us enough Baytril to treat the whole flock. We kept them warm, especially at night, the worst ones were brought into the garage in a dog crate with a heat lamp. I also used non activated Oxine AH to fog the coop, including the birds, as well as to clean waters etc. All of the birds showed improvement within a couple days of starting meds. They all recovered and have not shown symptoms again but I am aware that they are considered carriers.

    In your case, I'd give them the Tylan 50 rather then the sulmet. They will all come down with this in turn.

    When mine were being treated I did not add anything to their water such as bleach or ACV, didn't do vitamin C or anything else as I didn't want to overload them with "stuff". Otherwise I do use ACV in the wateres a couple times a week.
     
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  4. tadpole98

    tadpole98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had that in my flock, all 70 in the layers coop got it. we made them sage/garlic/and all sorts of stuff type of tea, and put it in their water. It smelled disgusting but it helped clear them up/
     
  5. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    Thank you, I am still reading, I recently switched back to pine shavings from straw as it seemed too wet during winter months and the shavings are really powdery, can this be my culpret too?
     
  6. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    I have always used straw in my coop easier to clean out. I'm sorry about your flock, I'm with Dawg on this. You will probably always battle it. Cull, do the necropsy, and clean coop real good.
     
  7. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    I cant believe it will be always in the flock, thats like saying my kids will never get better from the flu LOL.

    editing.... I phrased that wrong.... this is what my thoughts are "I cant believe that I need to Kill my birds"
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  8. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    I would agree here.

    There are several poultry diseases that make your birds carriers for life. Some diseases can be passed to offspring through the egg. You won't know what you are dealing with until you sacrifice one and have a necropsy performed.

    Have you brought in any adult birds?

    Trust me, I know it's not an easy thing to do. I had to make this choice recently and thankfully, mine wasn't anything contagious. Here's what I went through:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/741563/mouth-wound-on-cockerel-updated-with-necropsy-results/0_50
     
  9. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    Thanks I needed to know sulmet or tylan..... Thanks for your help I started tylan and acv and NOT killing my birds, but will have a blood draw.
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Sulmet is used for treating infectious coryza in conjunction with an antibiotic. Normally the telltale sign of birds that have coryza is a foul odor about the head area. It's also possible to have multiple diseases at once. Keep in mind that there are different strains of respiratory diseases...mild to severe, much like human colds/flu.
    If you're dealing with MG; tylan in conjunction with oxine may help. Denagard would be the preferred treatment. Surviving birds will still be carriers no matter what is used to treat them.
     
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