Bubbly Mucus and Losing Balance

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MadChickenMama, Feb 13, 2019.

  1. MadChickenMama

    MadChickenMama Songster

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    Noticed this morning ome of my hens acting funny.

    She seemed to have squatted down like she was being submissive, but the roo near her didn't do anything and she just sort of fell back onto her rear and she righted herself but then had a hard time righting herself once and for all. She did eventually, though.

    She then made to grab some treats I'd thrown out but she was halfhearted about it and never picked anything up.

    I picked her up and noticed she had some mucus in her mouth and it was bubbly. I did notice she was holding her mouth open sometimes.

    She looks to maybe be molting and also looks like the boys were a bit rough on her as she has a bald spot at the back of her head.

    I've got her quarantined inside and a minute ago she just sort of flipped out for no reason. I can't really explain it well. I feel like she maybe couldn't breathe or swallow and that caused her to flip out. I've had times where I've not been able to swallow and felt a little frantic. Her motions made me think of how I felt during those times, if that explains it.
     
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  2. SBFChickenGirl

    SBFChickenGirl Songster

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    I'm not the best with this kind of stuff, but there are others who are.
    @Eggcessive
     
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  3. SBFChickenGirl

    SBFChickenGirl Songster

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  4. MadChickenMama

    MadChickenMama Songster

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  5. MadChickenMama

    MadChickenMama Songster

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    I've got Tylan 50. I can't remember how much to give and how often. I want to say with my 10 week old Serama boy last year I gave him .5ml, but I'm not sure.

    This girl is a little heavier than the boy was as she'll be a year old in June.
     
  6. MadChickenMama

    MadChickenMama Songster

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    Also, I have her inside away from the rest of the flock. She wasn't having issues yesterday.

    My sister said I should treat the rest of the flock as well. If that's the case, how would I go about that?
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    First before I started with drugs, I would try to determine what is causing her to hold her beak open. Do you still see mucus inside her beak? Look inside for any mucus or foreign body, or yellow gunk. Do you see any watery or foamy eye or nasal drainage?

    Feel her crop gently, and note if it is flat and empty, full, soft, doughy, firm, or puffy. Is there an odor from her beak?

    Her loss of balance could be related to something like fluid in her belly, a reproductive disorder, Mareks, or from a head injury. I would isolate her and watch her. Offer some cooked egg, wet chicken feed, water, and give her some Poultry NutriDrench orally 2 ml daily.
     
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  8. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Crossing the Road

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    Have you looked inside her beak to make sure there is nothing stuck in her throat or airway.

    She is definitely in distress with her breathing
    so it would be tricky to administer any liquids/medication at this time.

    IF you decide to treat with the injectable Tylan50, weigh her. Dosage is .25ml per pound of weight given orally 3 times a day for 5 days.

    Keep her relatively warm and calm. It may be good to darken her cage just a little, by placing a towel over top that way she might feel a bit more secure.
     
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  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    You might need a flashlight and another person to hold her while you look inside the beak. Yellow plaques or caseous deposits sometimes can be found in the beak when they have canker (trich,) wet fowl pox, or thrush (fungus.) Sometimes a respiratory infection can cause deposits down inside the airway or trachea (ILT.) Figuring out if this crop related or a respiratory disease, or even a piece of food stuck in her airway may take a little time.

    I would also feel of her lower abdomen below the legs for any swelling or fluid later on when she is feeling better.

    Just want to mention that at least 2 people have recently reported seeing their chickens with foam or mucus coming from the beak, and in distress. After an hour or so, both were fine and acting normal, as if they had eaten something that caused this.
     
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  10. MadChickenMama

    MadChickenMama Songster

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    Well she didn't make it through the night. I had a feeling it would be like that.
    The mucus had gone after a bit and she was breathing okay without having her beak open. Then by the time I was going to bed around 11pm the mucus was back. It was so sticky and I just couldn't clear it enough.

    I'd looked down her throat as best I could and checked her cleft in her mouth everything seemed fine. The bubbles was most likely just air getting caught up in it.

    She didn't have any other symptoms so I doubt it was anything more than just a simple upper respiratory thing.

    All my other chickens are fine and looking and acting healthy. But I still intend to somehow clean out the coops. Not sure how to do it as I don't have enough places to put them all.

    I've got 2 chickens inside in a rabbit cage in a 6ftx6ft storage room and if this turns out to be something bad I really don't want to expose them as they've been inside for over a month now.
     
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