buff barred

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ThiefPouter06, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. ThiefPouter06

    ThiefPouter06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found a picture of a buff barred rooster on feathersite on the 2nd mixed breed page. I would assume this is a buff chicken with the barred gene? Just like a barred rock is a black chicken with the barred gene? How would you go about this? Other than barred and crele are there any other colors that you can get barred on? red barred?
     
  2. turtleblossom

    turtleblossom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think that crele is a barred pattern over bbr.
     
  3. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    I am growing out a few chicks from my blue rock roo and barred hens, and it seems the males are obvious, as they have a faint white spot on their head. They are just starting to grow their wings out, and I am seeing barring on them. I cant wait to see what they look like, I guess they will be blue barred.
     
  4. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    matt y. :

    I found a picture of a buff barred rooster on feathersite on the 2nd mixed breed page. I would assume this is a buff chicken with the barred gene? Just like a barred rock is a black chicken with the barred gene?

    Bingo, that is exactly what they are. [​IMG]

    matt y. :

    How would you go about this? Other than barred and crele are there any other colors that you can get barred on? red barred?

    Barred can be introduced into any color or pattern. How discernible the barring will be is another matter.

    Barring shows best on a black chicken, that is why practically almost all birds with barring are solid black chickens. As for creles, you may notice typically the barring is clearest or "better" on the black areas of the rooster such as the black breast & tail. Extremely hard selection and introducing other genes can help improve the barring on the brown areas, leading to some very nice creles that have nice barring on the brown areas. BTW Delawares are also barred, they are simply a columbian patterned bird with the addition of barring which is visible on the black of their hackles and tails.

    The statement still holds in general.. barring tends not to show as crisply and cleanly on softer/lighter colors such as buff. (still pretty, just the barring does not express as much is all). Barring can and does show a little better on reds, especially if the red is deeply pigmented intense red such as on show RIR, however the challenge of breeding clear crisp bars is still somewhat of a problem even on reds. Again, barred reds can be very beautiful- I had a barred red rooster for a short while, he was very pleasing to the eye.

    It seems a lot of Europeans are playing with barring on softer colors such as lemons, lavenders etc

    I would absolutely love to see how or if barring would show up on a pattern such as gold and silver laced...... (no idea if anybody has done this and took pictures) but in theory it certainly is possible to add barring to laced stock. Just don't ask me how they would look.​
     
  5. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:That's a sex linked mating.. all chicks with the spot & growing barred feathers are boys.. and if the rooster is blue(not splash) half of the chicks will be blue. Which means half of the sons will be blue barreds.
     
  6. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    Im really glad to have confirmation of that. It sure will make it easy to discern the girls from the boys as soon as they dry off. Im only growing out one male just to see what the blue barring will look like, but this way I can sell all the blacks and blue barreds, for now, since I am just wanting to add blue pullets to the "herd" for now.
     
  7. ThiefPouter06

    ThiefPouter06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info! how does black rank to buff in dominance? I have a buff orp roo and a buff orp hen. Would it be better to get a barred roo or a barred hen for the first cross to start a buff barred project?
     
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    That's a far more complex question as buff really is made out of several different genes, and there is more than one way to make a buff bird also. I don't know what buff orps have. That said, probably expect the crosses out of buff orp and barred to be similar to Black Stars (darkish body with brown on hackles, chest= black stars are a sex linked cross between RIR and BR hens). Pick a barred cross bird and breed back to a buff and you should hit on a few solid or nearly solid buffs with barring, and it's very straightforward from there(breed birds with barring to pure buffs each generation).

    How to start doesn't matter much, however if you use a barred hen that will be a sex linked mating and you will be able to use only the sons from that.
     
  9. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a Silver Laced Wyandotte rooster and a few Barred Rock hens. Given (a lot) of time I could toss some of their eggs into an incubator and see what comes out.

    The Barred Rocks should start laying any day now, but are in with the SLW and with a brilliant, dark red/mahagony Ameracauna rooster.

    I don't know the Ameracauna's background (he's just an EE). Assuming he isn't a "pure" red, are the genetics still there to possibly produce red barred using him and the Barred Rock hens?

    This is the wrong time of year to have incubators running. I need to stop reading BYC [​IMG]
     
  10. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    SLW x BR= most likely black hens with white on neck..(like a Black Star except the brown is replaced with white) and barred roos with white showing on hackles and saddles at maturity. There may be a few black and white birds in "weird patterns".

    Not sure if you knew this already, lacing is very complex and needs to be pure for at least hm, 4 or 5 genes so it can be rather difficult to get birds back to decent/good lacing. Still, be very interesting if you go for it! Barring is dominant, so it also would be rather straightforward if you attempt this- just repeatedly breed a bird with barred back to birds pure for lacing..

    Yes you could try for it with the EE rooster for red barreds. If he's as dark as you say then he has the "necessary" genes already even if he may not be exactly pure for them. A bit tricky using him for a red barred project though as that will be a sex linked mating so only the sons will be barred. You'd be stuck with breeding the siblings together, however the chance of hitting on a red barred would be pretty low(one out of 8-10 or so) One possible way to do this is by breeding barred son to a dark red hen- a RIR? and you should get some decent reds with barring from that.
     

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