Buff Genetics Chart

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by pete55, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    BUFF GENETICS CHART AND MATING OUTCOMES.

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    Last edited: Sep 29, 2011
  2. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Thanks...[​IMG]
     
  3. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    So these are 5 unrelated groups? And does this pretty much hold true as charted only if it's grey? Excuse my thickness, just want to be sure I understand the charts.

    I mean, it pretty much looks like how any solid color mated to any other solid color would work, but I thought buff worked a bit differently. What I don't know about chicken genetics would fill a book lol.
     
  4. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    This is for Geese. WAAY different from the Buff in chickens.


    Basically Buff in Geese works the same way it does with recessive genes like mottling, silkied feathering, chocolate, and lavender in Chickens.
     
  5. swheat

    swheat The Bantam Barn

    Mar 18, 2008
    Alabama
    My Coop
    Would the chart be correct for breeding white to buff and buff to white ?
     
  6. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, and these charts are not typical. Buff is a sexlinked gene.
     
  7. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    It's a beautiful chart. However, I have one point of contention. In common genetics parlance, the visual color comes BEFORE the word "split", and anything after the word "split" is the unseen color. Thus a gander that looks gray but carries the buff gene would properly be called "Gray split Buff" and not "Split Gray."


    Illia, I think "buff" in geese is analogous to "dun" in chickens. They both are inherited the same way, and turn black to brown. But since the geese are gray, the effect is a "light black" turning to "light brown" that looks somewhat "buff."

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  8. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Dun is not sexlinked. Choc is... [​IMG]
     
  9. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Dun is not sexlinked. Choc is... [​IMG]

    AHHHHHHH........yes, I got them mixed up....THANKS!!!

    OK, so then just substitute that into what I said above. I think things would be easier to learn if the same name was given to the same mutation in various breeds and species, rather than coming up with new names for the same mutation. "Buff" geese versus "buff" chickens is the perfect example.

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  10. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Logic as that sounds, it takes quite a bit of DNA sequencing to confirm genes are the same.

    For instance. The blue gene in dogs, called D, is the same gene as lavender in chickens. The same gene in mice is called "leaden" and is not the blue gene in mice called D.
     

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