buff meat bird time

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by bwakymcbwakbwak, Apr 20, 2019.

  1. bwakymcbwakbwak

    bwakymcbwakbwak In the Brooder

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    Dec 6, 2018
    Decided to try buff orphingtons for meat as I want a dual purpose broody bird. If you have raised some buffs for meat how long did you let them go. Heard 12, 16 weeks. Even longer.

    Experiences?
     
  2. couponsaver47

    couponsaver47 Songster

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    Mine were 4-6yrs & not laying any longer so I stewed them!! Old hens are very good stewed right!!
     
    bwakymcbwakbwak likes this.
  3. Hawgfan

    Hawgfan Chirping

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    My hatchery stock Buff Orpington cockerels started reaching 5 lb live weight by 16 weeks for the better ones. Others took longer. I don't process in large batches, so it isn't an issue for me. I like to fry them, so all were processed by 24 weeks to ensure tenderness, regardless of weight. Some will say this is too long for fryers. I soak overnight in buttermilk, and pan fry slowly. I've been pleased with the results, but I don't mind a little texture. How you prepare, and when, is a personal thing. They were fed 20% protein their entire lives, and raised on grass. They aren't very efficient cost-wise, but that isn't my goal. I like the flavor, so I raise a few every year and consider it more of a delicacy, as opposed to commercially available chicken that tends to be more of a boring, commodity item. I kept 8 pullets from that batch. They are one year old today, and one is currently broody. Your results may vary.
     
  4. bwakymcbwakbwak

    bwakymcbwakbwak In the Brooder

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    I really appreciate your reply. Will try your method. BTW, you are an example of the awesomeness of chicken people.
     
  5. Hawgfan

    Hawgfan Chirping

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    You're very welcome. You'll find most are willing to share their experiences. There are plenty of things I haven't seen or done, but I try to help out where I can. In time you'll learn what works best for your own goals and be able to pass that knowledge along. I try to remember that there are many variables, and that nothing is an absolute. Any advice you get is probably great for whoever is giving it. However, you may need to tweak things a little for yourself (local climate, breed of chicken and quality of stock, personal goals, etc.). There are many things to learn and enjoy along the way. Best of luck.
     
    bwakymcbwakbwak likes this.
  6. WiderHorizons

    WiderHorizons In the Brooder

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    Edit: I believe I should just start another thread. But very interesting!
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
  7. LilyD

    LilyD Crowing

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    I have had heritage orpingtons and for me the magic number was 18 to 24 weeks I would process any time between that so they were still around 5-6 lbs and were tender enough to still cook anyway. I also process the older laying hens as stewing chickens for chicken enchiladas and chicken and dumplings or chicken stew. They have much more flavor the older they get and the extra fat is great for cooking soup and stew recipes.
     
    bwakymcbwakbwak likes this.

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