Buff Orpington eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by simonsez3, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. simonsez3

    simonsez3 New Egg

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    Sep 6, 2016
    Hi everyone. This is my first post. I have 5 chickens...1 Wyandotte, 2 buff orpingtons, 1 welsummer, and 1 easter egger. The Wyandotte and the Orpingtons have started laying. Which surprised me since they are the largest of the group. Anyway, my concern is that the eggs of one Orpington are a buff color but then kind of lightly frosted with what I assume is calcium. The other Orpington's eggs are beautiful, larger and smooth. They have only been laying for about 10 days so perhaps it will work out. They are all eating the same feed of course. I found info on the internet that says it may be due to an excess of calcium. But I don't know. Any ideas? Do I need to be concerned?
     
  2. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member

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    [​IMG] Hello and [​IMG] so glad you have joined us.

    You should post an intro under the New Members forum to receive a proper welcoming.


    Assuming they are eating the same layer feed - I wouldn't get worried. Early eggs can have some issues.

    But you could post a pic of one of her eggs to get better opines.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    It will eventually work out, or it won't, and she will always have weird eggs, but usually things even out after a month or so.
     
  4. simonsez3

    simonsez3 New Egg

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    Sep 6, 2016
    Thanks for your responses. I'll just calm down and see what happens. They all seem happy and healthy so it might just be a quirky chicken thing. I'm just glad they FINALLY started laying.
     
  5. simonsez3

    simonsez3 New Egg

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    Sep 6, 2016
    [​IMG]
    FYI This is the difference I am seeing in the 2 BO eggs.
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I've had eggs like that before. Are you feeding layer? Sometimes they don't need that extra calcium they put in it and they get too much calcium. I prefer either a non medicated grower or an All Flock with oyster shells in a separate bowl so they can self regulate. I haven't seen any shell problems like I used to feeding layer.
     
  7. simonsez3

    simonsez3 New Egg

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    I read that about the extra calcium. I have just switched to layer feed and these 2 eggs were laid just before switching, I did have oyster shell out free choice. I occasionally feed them cottage cheese and often give them chaffhaye that I have for the goats.
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    It should eventually work itself out. I get all kinds of colors and shapes, but thankfully haven't gotten anything to weird or gross yet, I think I would kick it off to the side, some folks take pictures of them, there are a few threads with funky eggs and their content, I have a weak stomach for such things, so I don't look at them.
     
  9. simonsez3

    simonsez3 New Egg

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    I agree! Although from a scientific point of view it is interesting. As long as you dont find it in your own nest.
     
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Have you tried washing or buffing the coating off the whitish egg? Is it a dark tan underneath? Or does the white color continue through the shell? the thought I have is that the hen producing these eggs has some genetic limitation in the gland that applies the tan color. Some birds tend to lay eggs that are just "different". But, as long as the inside is normal, you should be fine. If you are hatching your own eggs in future, just don't set any eggs from her. This is what I call a "soft cull". A term of my own making. By always setting your best eggs, you will eventually have a flock of hens who only lay "best" eggs.
     

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