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Buff Orpingtons have sneezing / runny noses...got my roo sick now too!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FrankRizzo, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 31, 2010
    Ardmore, Al
    I recently introduced 4 new buff orpington hens last week. When I took them home I noticed one (about 3 or 4 months old) was sneezing. Didnt think much of it then but now a week later and my poor Buff Orpington Roo is sneezing , yellow snot coming out of his nose, eyes are watery, acting really sleepy during the day. He is about 7 months old. They all have been eating, grass from the yard, chicken scratch with mixed grain, and drinking fresh water. I keep them confined in my garden and always keep their coop pretty clean. His feces is looking normal from what I can tell. Please look at the pics of him below and any advice anyone has would be awesome! Thanks!

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  2. kristen2678

    kristen2678 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 26, 2009
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    They're all going to need antibiotics - quickly. Do a search here for the type and amount relative to respiratory infections. Hopefully it's not something more serious.

    New chickens should always be quarantined for 30 days before introducing them to your flock. This is a good example of why......
     
  3. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 31, 2010
    Ardmore, Al
    Update : Just went out and checked them again. The Hen that was sneezing has same symptoms and the roo's feces is light tan/yellowish in color and runny looking.
     
  4. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 31, 2010
    Ardmore, Al
    Quote:Thanks for the fast response Kristen. I am going this morning to get them some antibiotics but was wondering if there was a certain kind that would be better for them. This is my first year raising birds so from now on I will definately quarantine new any new birds I bring home [​IMG]
     
  5. chickenpiedpiper

    chickenpiedpiper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2008
    New Durham NH
    Sadly, there are many types of sickness that can cause these sort of symptoms. Thankfully, there are readily available types of antibiotics at the feed stores that you can use. However, here are a few tips that I have learned the hard way.

    If you don't notice a dramatic improvement in 24-36 hours, you have the WRONG antibiotic. don't continue wasting your medication and time using the wrong stuff.

    Once you have a sniffle/upper respiratory, plan on everyone in your flock getting it, whether you quarantine or not. It is generally airborne, and will travel! be cautious, and get enough meds for everyone.

    Mix the meds in small batches that you know they will drink dry in 24 hours, if they are a bit thirsty in the morning, they will get a strong dose of the meds when you present the fresh batch. (a bit thirsty does not mean dying of thirst.)

    Check with your local store for a product called sulfadimethoxine. it is a durvet product, just like duramycin, but it treats infectious coryzia in chickens. Any time I see sniffles with eye complications I use this single product, and it is gone in days. any of the 'mycin' products do not have ANY effect on coryzia. The product is hard to find, I cant even buy it in my state, even tho it is cheap, 12.30 per packet. I have to order it online, from Neeps.com, so I keep a supply on hand at all times. Do not mix too strong, more is not better, in fact, too strong and it will kill. Mix it according to directions. Spelling is important, make sure you get the right stuff, not the stuff for dogs! lol.

    Take comfort in the fact that the new hen may not have been the one to bring the problem too the flock, in fact sometimes the opposite is true. Your flock may have been carriers of the organism in a dormant state, as they had built up an immunity, and the new hen, caught it from your birds, and it changed just enough to make your roo a bit ill. Microorganisms are amazingly adaptive, and a quarantine is a good idea, but it will not solve all the issues, it may just delay them! A bird that gets sick from your flock will have the same timing as if it came to your place carrying an illness! It is sometimes impossible to tell which came first, the bird or the sniffles!

    Send for the sulfadimethoxine now, so it is on the way. Try the locally available 'mycin' type antibiotics, and if they work, great, if they don't, the other will. Finding the correct antibiotic is sometimes trial and error.

    Good Luck!
     
  6. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 31, 2010
    Ardmore, Al
    Quote:Wow thanks for the information!!!! I am on my way now to search for some sulfadimethoxine. Very helpful of you! My chickens and myself thank you tremendously!!!!!
     
  7. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 31, 2010
    Ardmore, Al
    Well got the sulfadimethoxine and the rooster is already back to his normal routine of running the hens around and pecking and eating/drinking again after just 5 hours. The hen is doing a little better. Ive been having to give her the medication through a tube as she hasnt been eating or drinking...hopefully she will pull through. Thanks you two for the fast reply and advice...love this community and learn something new every time I log into this!!!!
     

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