Buff orps laying, but EE's aren't

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Shaylynne, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. Shaylynne

    Shaylynne Just Hatched

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    Hello!

    This has puzzled me the last couple weeks, my Easter eggers all stopped laying a couple weeks ago, I have 4 of them. I have 3 buff Orpingtons who are laying everyday, still getting 3 eggs a day in the winter from them. They are all 8 months old.

    Are EE's known to not produce at all in the winter? I'm new to all this.

    Thanks!

    Edit: I read the sticky thread about egg production, but I didn't catch an answer for a particular breed to stop laying while the other breed keeps on keeping on.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  2. OC Chick

    OC Chick Out Of The Brooder

    Following! One question for you, how old were your EE's when they started laying? I'm curious because I heard they take longer to start laying. Does the length of their lay time affect when they stop laying for the winter?
     
  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    I've found that Easter Eggers need more protein to be regular producers than other breeds. Layer feed just doesn't cut it for them.
     
  4. Shaylynne

    Shaylynne Just Hatched

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    Surprisingly to me, my EE's started laying a month before my buff orpingtons. My EE's started laying at 6 months and the buffs at almost 7 months. I love my pink, blue and green eggs from the EEs :)
    (And of course the brown ones from the buffs:D)
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
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  5. Shaylynne

    Shaylynne Just Hatched

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    Interesting, thanks for the insight. Anything in particular that you'd recommend for more protein?
     
  6. OC Chick

    OC Chick Out Of The Brooder

    Good to know!!! The horror stories of them not laying till 8 months or longer had me worried and then when you posted that yours stopped laying altogether had me freaking out that they don't lay much. I love my EE's and am going crazy with anticipation for them to start laying to see what color eggs I get. Good information above about them needing more protein to lay through the winter.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Don't feed them layer. Just stick with higher protein unmedicated starter, grower, or flock raiser feed and provide crushed oyster shell separately. You don't need layer feed to get eggs. It doesn't have a magic ingredient.
     
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  8. Shaylynne

    Shaylynne Just Hatched

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    It's definitely fun finding out the colors of the eggs! My kids found the first one (a blue egg) in their play house outside. It was a HUGE deal for them, hehe! Needless to say I kept them in the run/coop for a couple days after that to train her.
    When they start submissively squatting you'll know eggs are on the way soon! :D
     
  9. Shaylynne

    Shaylynne Just Hatched

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    Awesome, thanks for this! I had started to save my egg shells to bake/grind up as a calcium supplement. Is that something you'd recommend, or just stick with the oyster shells?
     
  10. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How old are your EE's? Next to my California Greys, my EE"s are my best layers. Everyone else stopped before them early October and those still aren't laying while my older EE's stopped later molted and are already laying again. Mine have all started laying between five and six months old.
    Now that I've said that, those hatched last spring, only half have just started laying while I'm waiting for the others, perhaps because the days are still short and it was a late spring hatch.
    I'm also wondering if the father had an effect on this. Oh, well, the rest should start soon.
     

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