Buff Plymouth rock / Chamois pencilled Friesan

JayBee13

Hatching
Sep 19, 2020
4
2
6
Hello,

I was wondering if anyone could satisfy my curiosity...

I have two lovely Buff Plymouth Rock Bantam girls and one (very young) Chamois Pencilled Friesan Cock.

I was wondering if we were to let nature take its course when he is older what the mix might end up looking like?

If anyone knows, or better still, has photos, I would love to know.
 

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NatJ

Crowing
Mar 20, 2017
3,607
5,681
366
USA
You will get little golden chickens, probably midway between the parents in size.

They might have white markings like their father.

They will have single combs (like both of their parents.)

The daughters will probably have dark legs like their father, and the sons have light legs like their mother. You might be able to use that to sex them, although leg color is sometimes unclear when they are very young.

Egg color and number of eggs laid (by the daughters) will probably be between what is normal for the parents' breeds.
 

JayBee13

Hatching
Sep 19, 2020
4
2
6
I haven’t a clue about the results... but those are 2 VERY pretty birds :love
Thank you, we are very fond of them especially the little cockerel (Hayhay) we hatched ourselves this summer. Bit of a home school lockdown project for the kids.
 

JayBee13

Hatching
Sep 19, 2020
4
2
6
You will get little golden chickens, probably midway between the parents in size.

They might have white markings like their father.

They will have single combs (like both of their parents.)

The daughters will probably have dark legs like their father, and the sons have light legs like their mother. You might be able to use that to sex them, although leg color is sometimes unclear when they are very young.

Egg color and number of eggs laid (by the daughters) will probably be between what is normal for the parents' breeds.
Thank you. That is really interesting about the legs, why is the colour likely to pass differently through the genders? I shall definitely keep an eye out for it.
 

NatJ

Crowing
Mar 20, 2017
3,607
5,681
366
USA
That is really interesting about the legs, why is the colour likely to pass differently through the genders?
Because the gene for dark leg color is on the Z (sex) chromosome. A rooster has two Z chromosomes, while the hen has ZW.

The hen determines the gender of the offspring by passing a Z chromosome to her sons, and a W chromosome to her daughters. The rooster passes a Z to all of his offspring.

So the daughters only get the father's gene for leg color, and they match him.

The sons get both the father's and mothers' genes for leg color. Because the light color is dominant, their legs will be light colored.

(This only works one direction. If the father had the dominant gene for light legs, then chicks of both genders could have light legs, no matter what color legs the mother had.)
 

JayBee13

Hatching
Sep 19, 2020
4
2
6
Because the gene for dark leg color is on the Z (sex) chromosome. A rooster has two Z chromosomes, while the hen has ZW.

The hen determines the gender of the offspring by passing a Z chromosome to her sons, and a W chromosome to her daughters. The rooster passes a Z to all of his offspring.

So the daughters only get the father's gene for leg color, and they match him.

The sons get both the father's and mothers' genes for leg color. Because the light color is dominant, their legs will be light colored.

(This only works one direction. If the father had the dominant gene for light legs, then chicks of both genders could have light legs, no matter what color legs the mother had.)
Ok, so a bit like our xx xy only the other way round or like dark eye colour being dominant over light.
Intersting stuff, thank you.
 

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