building a run with wood for the bottom part of walls?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jackcreek, Jun 13, 2016.

  1. jackcreek

    jackcreek Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 2, 2016
    I am about to build my permanent run. Due to wind issues I need to make the walls so they create a wind break for the chickens. I am currently planning on using 3/4 in osb on the bottom 4 ft of the walls. Possibly considering tin to cover it but haven't decided. Does anyone have any input as to this being predator proof? The top portion of wall will be wire.
     
  2. ladynewtochicks

    ladynewtochicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    247
    19
    68
    Mar 21, 2016
    Montana
    I think I have just built what you are describing. A friend gave me a bunch of "wall sections" that he never got around to using, they are already weathered but I think it will serve its purpose for now... As far as predator proof that has yet to be tested but I built it with neighboring foxes in mind.

    [​IMG]

    I extended it taller by framing it in and adding 2ft of hardware cloth. It also has a hardware cloth dig skirt.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2016
  3. SanDogDewey

    SanDogDewey Just Hatched

    16
    1
    16
    Jun 9, 2016
    NW Oregon
    I used treated 2 x 6's between my fence posts and fastened 12" of 1/2" hardware cloth beneath it.
     
  4. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    I strongly suggest you avoid OSB at all cost, it will simply not last outside exposed to the elements especially with ground or near ground contact... Spend the extra money now for treated plywood or treated boards (ground contact rated) now and you will be great full in a few years time you did... Avoid the cheap treated landscape timbers they are not treated for ground contact and will rot out in short...

    This is one of those times that being penny wise and dollar foolish will come back to bite you, best to spend the extra dollars now...
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. jackcreek

    jackcreek Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 2, 2016
    Yes those photos are what I'm talking about!! Except mine will go all the way around the run. I never know which direction the wind will come from here! I deal with pretty much all the predators here including wolves so that is my main concern about doing this. I like the 2x6 idea! That would definitely slow the critters down!! I agree the osb won't stand up long term but it is free. So if it will work for keeping the predators out for now I will use it. It doesn't have direct ground contact. We put in a footer to build the walls on and the run will have a roof. I love my chickens but I hate shoveling snow!!!
     
  6. ladynewtochicks

    ladynewtochicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    247
    19
    68
    Mar 21, 2016
    Montana

    Exactly the same reason I'm using it they were free! If it lasts for a few seasons then I'm happy. My inlaws dog has already tried to get in and she hasn't succeeded but also she's fat and lazy so I doubt that compares to a real predator.
     
  7. TalkALittle

    TalkALittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,605
    575
    181
    Dec 15, 2014
    Massachusetts
    Depending on how much wind you get you might consider using a paddle bit and drilling a whole bunch of 1-2 inch holes in the plywood/osb sheets. It will still provide a wind break but will allow for some cross ventilation at ground level near the birds without compromising strength or predator protection.
     
  8. jackcreek

    jackcreek Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 2, 2016
    Great idea I had been wondering about how to make it cooler! That's something I could just start with a few and add more till I get the amount right, Thank you!
     
  9. Can you use the tin in place of any of the OSB? Lighter and still provides a wind break.
     
  10. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,384
    305
    148
    Jun 10, 2014
    Meh - my coop is painted OSB, and going on 5 years old now, and is holding up fine. The OSB was $7 a sheet, treated ply of the same thickness was $30 a sheet. Counting the floor I believe I used 8 sheets. For a small coop for 20ish chickens, I'd never recoup the extra investment.

    At some point I'll need to replace the OSB (probably another 5 years), but most likely I'll have replaced the coop with another barn by that point. (The coop also has a flock of sheep and a llama using it as a scratching post, so its not like the OSB is having an easy life)
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by