Building a Sizeable Chook Shed - 4.5m x 4.5m (approx 15ft x 15ft)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by fizz, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. fizz

    fizz Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2011
    NE Victoria, Australia
    Well after a couple of years of talking, planning, talking and planning we finally bit the bullet and decided to start building our chook shed. The factors we had to deal with were:
    • Climate: cool/cold wet winters (down to -8c/14f) - we usually get one or two snow falls per year and multiple frosts; warm/hot dry summers (up to 36c/98f). We're at 775m (approx 2500ft) above sea level.
    • Weather: In winter the wind/rain/sleet comes mainly from the west to south west. In summer the hottest winds come form the north-north west.
    • I wanted at least two separated bays
    • A storage room that had enough room for a broody box
    • Doors wide enough for wheelbarrows and with an external door with sufficient height to sweep the coop flooring straight out into the barrow.
    • It had to be tall enough for my 6'4" husband to stand upright in
    • This is the first structure we have ever built so we are total newbies to building!


    We sourced some good hardwood for the bearers and joists from a salvage yard along with a door for a good price. The wall and roof framing is treated pine seconds. We're also getting Colorbond roofing and two strips of Laserlite to help get light into the coop.

    We nestled the chook shed on the edge of our orchard. It is framed on the eastern side by an avenue of Oriental Pears, an established chestnut on the south, and a semi-established maple, Williams pear and golden elm on the western and north-western sides.

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    The bearers are cemented in. They're made of ironbark.
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    Then come the joists which are hung between the bearers.
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    The southern wall frame is erected. There is space at the top for shuttered vents.
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    The side walls getting knocked together...
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    ...and erected! There will be ventilation along the top of both side walls.
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    Front wall in place. We had to put tarps on the roof and north-western side as the roofing iron has been delayed and we were expecting gale force wind and rain [​IMG]
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    The barn doors my husband built using salvaged hardwood.
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    Sarking goes on...
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    ... and then the weatherboards.
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    Husband applying waterproof membrane to the floor. (This stuff rocks by the way!) Still no roof. [​IMG]
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    The northern wall with two pop doors that will go out into their individual runs. The top portion will remain open and be covered with avian mesh (like American 'hardware cloth').
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    The western side with the pop door going out into the orchard.
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    The southern wall. Yes, it's starting to look a bit like a Boy Scout hall... dib dib dib dob dob dob [​IMG]
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    The eastern wall with the glass panel door going into the store room and the barn doors that open from the chicken side of the coop.
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    Membrane dry. Weather coming. Still no bloomin' roof! [​IMG]
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    One small section of weatherboards left to put up. It will have to wait until this weekend.
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    And here it is nestled amongst our garden. We're digging it so far [​IMG]
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    As of today, we're still waiting for the roof (and it just started hailing [​IMG]). Thankfully the waterproofing has held up brilliantly. I will post further pics as we get more done.
     
  2. AlienChick

    AlienChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 9, 2010
    Glasgow, KY
    Congratulations on building your coop.
    Awesome job!
    What a LOVELY location!
     
  3. McKinneyMike

    McKinneyMike Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 20, 2013
    McKinney, TX
    Could you give more details about the water proof membrane that was used on the floor of the coop?
     
  4. fizz

    fizz Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2011
    NE Victoria, Australia
    Thank you for the kind comments AlienChick. We love where we live - we get the four definite seasons, which is quite rare here in Australia, and our elevation generally minimises the hottest weather and keeps us below 34c. Which all makes for a great place to garden and raise children, Australorps and Orpingtons [​IMG]
     
  5. fizz

    fizz Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2011
    NE Victoria, Australia
    MckinneyMike:
    We used a product available here in Australia called Green K10 Plus. There is some info here: http://www.parexdavco.com.au/product.php?id_product=103


    Edited to fix typos and add:
    So far we have found the first coating to be excellent. We had 20mm of rain without a roof on and where we had some significant puddles there doesn't seem to have been any penetration. Also we have given the floor a good beating as we have been in and out, dragged ladders and 12mm (half inch) ply across, and dropped hammers on it and yet that first coat is still in excellent shape and hasn't scuffed or flaked off except where it was applied a bit thinly.

    The instructions suggest building up a layer approximately 1mm thick so once all the ply has gone in we will do another coat or two and spread it about 6 inches up the walls. We will be using the deep litter method and will be interested to see how it holds up over time.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  6. fizz

    fizz Out Of The Brooder

    21
    2
    24
    Oct 18, 2011
    NE Victoria, Australia
    Building update:
    All weatherboards on and painted with first coat.

    [​IMG]

    Roof, sisalation, guttering and flashing is on.
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    We were surprised at the amount of light coming in, although the chestnut and elm haven't come into leaf yet. If we have a heat problem due to the laserlite we will install seasonal panels under the clear sections during summer.

    Ply has gone in to form the walls. We will have avian mesh on the front, on the upper half of the internal walls, and on all the ventilation vents.
    [​IMG]

    Hopefully the rest of the ply will go up this week (yay for daylight savings! [​IMG]) and we'll get stuck into the mesh next weekend.
     
  7. diamond3girl

    diamond3girl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 15, 2013
    WA
    OHHHHHH WOOOOOOOOW!!!!!!!!! Im moving In!!!!!! you could house grandma in there with them or as i said ME! haha love it... dream house or chook Palace so happy for ur chooks to b going into that hotel motel... Its a credit to you, enjoy :)
     
  8. fizz

    fizz Out Of The Brooder

    21
    2
    24
    Oct 18, 2011
    NE Victoria, Australia
    Hahaha! We had a friend help out with the wall framing and putting on the roof. He asked if it was actually a chook shed or a place to stick my mother-in-law [​IMG]
     
  9. fizz

    fizz Out Of The Brooder

    21
    2
    24
    Oct 18, 2011
    NE Victoria, Australia
    Update:
    The coop and run are done and chooks have moved in. Still a few more little jobs to do.

    Nestled in amongst the trees:
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    Interior doors. The ply panels are where the nest boxes will go. They will be accessed from the store room - they're one of the next jobs to do.
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    More interior shots after the mesh had been done:
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    First chickens are in - bantam Buff Orpies [​IMG]. This was taken on their first evening with us back in November. We kept them in the coop for two weeks while we were getting the run ready for them.
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    We're using rice hulls as the litter and we love it! No odour and keeps flies/moisture down. The kick-board is removable and is there to keep the litter in.
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    Building the run:
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    We used 90x90 treated pine posts so they could be concreted straight into the ground.
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    Frame goes up. The overall run is 4.5m x 7.5m (15x24 feet). This will be split into two separate runs lengthways.
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    We used long-life mesh for the skirt. It goes the entire way around the coop and run.
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    At the gate we lay the mesh underneath the bottom framing board and then trimmed it back a bit. The board has been drilled and foot-long reo has been hammered into the ground to help keep it in place. We have also covered the run with mesh.
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    Second lot of occupants move in - black bantam Orpingtons.
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    This is the piping for the water system. It hasn't been connected yet but is in place and ready.
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    The two outlets will have branches that come off with little drinking cups.
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    So, we still have to fit out the store room with benches, a broody box and a timeout box. Nesting boxes need to be done by March and we need to build bigger roosts now that our pullets have grown up a bit. More to come...
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. kateseidel

    kateseidel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 9, 2010
    I take a lot of heat from my husband about my excessive coop building - now I am showing him your amazing setup and telling him I could be worse!! You have done an incredible job - so nicely designed, sturdily built, and I love your colors. And this is a great location!
     

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