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Building the Chicken McMansion (Part 3)

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Chieftain, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. Chieftain

    Chieftain Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Foundation Construction Link (Part 1): https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=280847

    Roof
    Construction Link (Part 2): https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=283795

    Nesting
    Boxes for the Chicken McMansion (Part 4) https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=284067

    Windows
    for the Chicken McMansion (Part 5) https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=285527

    Roosts
    for the Chicken McMansion (Part 6) https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=287385

    Rainwater
    Collection System Construction (Part 7) https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=290206

    This
    is the third part in my little series on building the Chicken McMansion. I have looked at dozens of coops here and other places and tried to incorporate all of the lessons that people have learned before me, and to incorporate some of the building skills I have picked up over the years.

    My design criteria were

    1. Must be wind proof.

    2. Must be varmint and critter proof

    3. Must be quiet. (We are in a residential neighborhood so the less noise, the better)

    The two links above show you how we got to the point I am beginning at. Please review those threads to see how the foundation and roof went.

    The first step was to install four 2x4 timbers around the perimeter of the base. There is 2 feet of clearance between the bottom of the 2x4 and the top of the foundation timbers. Lots of room for the girls to run. I used 8 galvanized corner brackets secured with 1 5/8" Gold Screws to mount these 2x4s. I used my chop saw to make sure they were cut very accurately, and then screwed them all into place once I ensured everything was level.

    [​IMG]

    The floor of the coop is of course going to be exposed to a lifetime of chicken poop, and I am concerned about the floor rotting out eventually. The solution was pretty simple. I added a couple more framing 2x4s, and then cut a pair of pieces of Hardi-Backer board to fit.

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    Hardi-backer is used for any application that will be wet, especially in showers as a base for ceramic tile. It is impermeable to water. It cannot rot. It is ideal for this application, and I plan on painting it with a 1-part epoxy paint.

    This will be a 100 year coop...

    Next, I added a 2x6 footer all the way around the edge of the floor, but leaving the side facing the cleanout open. I put down a bead of polyurethane based adhesive, clamped the 2x6 in place with a heavy bar clamp, and then secured both ends with several heavy construction screws.

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    There is a method to my madness...

    Next it was time for framing. I am building two large nesting boxes that will be attached to the outside of the coop, so I am framing for them now. I used 2x4 framing for the large lower opening (nest box) and then switched to lighter 2x2 framing for the windows above. All of it was again secured in position with my nailgun and 2" galvanized wire nails, and then I went back and pre-drilled holes in the structural 2x2's and secured them with gold screws as well.

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    One of the most common comments I have seen about first-time coops is "I wish I would have insulated it". I am doing exactly that. I am using 1 1/2" foam block insulation. This material is mold resistant, and does not contain hazardous chemicals like formaldehyde. It is very strong, and easy to cut with a box knife. I got the smaller pieces at the Home Center because they were easier to deal with than the much larger pieces they also carry.

    [​IMG]

    I started with the ceiling over the coop. I cut the blocks to fit, and they pressed in very nicely. I installed the insulation level with the bottom of the roof joists, and left a substantial airspace between the bottom of the polycarbonate roofing and the top of the insulation. this will allow the roof to breath in hot weather and will prevent warping, while reducing the heat transfer in to the top of the coop.

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    Once the ceiling was insulated, I cut 3/8" plywood to cover the whole ceiling. I screwed it in with 1 5/8" Gold Screws.

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    Last edited: May 1, 2011
  2. Omran

    Omran Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2008
    Bagdad KY
    THAT IS FANTASTIC, very beautiful design and real strong build coop. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  3. fldiver97

    fldiver97 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 5, 2009
    Middleton, WI
    [​IMG] Wow, it will be a Fort Knox type chicken mansion!!!!! Great job, keep the updates coming
     
  4. Chieftain

    Chieftain Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Around the inside, and against the 2x6 I installed first, I cut lengths of Hardi-backer siding, and screwed it in place to protect the wood. I intend to fill the gaps between everything with some automotive bondo, as it is also waterproof.

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    Next, I cut pieces of 3/8" plywood to fit on the inside walls. I screwed it to the framing I installed earlier.

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    Now that I have something to hold it, I cut pieces of 1 1/2" styrofoam insulation and installed them in the open spaces. By cutting them to close tolerance, they stay in place all by themselves.

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    The coop will have 3 screened and glazed windows for ventilation. Each one is 2 feet wide and 16" high, so I have almost 8 square feet of ventilation for five birds...not bad!!

    And that is where things stand right now. I still have 2 more interior walls to construct, and then I will be ready for siding. As you can see, the walls are now quite thick and will insulated, either with solid wood or wood and styrofoam.

    I also plan on running electricity out there and am working on exactly what I want. So far, so good, Eventually I will insulate underneath the floor, and add a plywood cap too. The entire interior will be primed with Kilz, and then painted. The floor will be sealed with automotive bondo, then painted with epoxy paint.

    The entire coop will be very durable by the time it's all said and done, and I doubt if it will be lacking for much...

    More to follow, so lookout for Part 4...
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2010
  5. sianara

    sianara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Central MA
    BRAVO! [​IMG] BRAVO! [​IMG] BRAVO! [​IMG] Can't wait to see the next installment [​IMG]
     
  6. The Sheriff

    The Sheriff Overrun With Chickens

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    Northern CA
    Somebodies gonna' have to buy a Golden Feather Membership for more photo storage. [​IMG]

    Like me!
     
  7. CARS

    CARS Chillin' With My Peeps

    Looks great! One thing that you stated isn't true though. Automotive body filler "bondo" is NOT water proof. If water proof is what you want you will need an epoxy or fiberglass based filler.
     
  8. GraceAK

    GraceAK Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 28, 2009
    Eagle River, AK
    Hahaha! that is a great coop! Your building skills leave me in the dust! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The only thing it needs is room for the chickens you will inevitably get when you catch impromptu chick buying fever!

    Anyway, that is going to be an amazing coop! [​IMG]
     
  9. cpmatthews

    cpmatthews New Egg

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    Dec 30, 2009
    London, UK
    Wow! Looks great! Can't wait for the next set of photos.
     
  10. Chieftain

    Chieftain Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My pal Gus is having a hard time figuring out what all this hammering is about...

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