built a chicken tractor, now i need some help on how to pull it.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by cbenson6820, Sep 30, 2012.

  1. cbenson6820

    cbenson6820 Out Of The Brooder

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    I built my first chicken tractor and i need help figuring out the best way to pull it. I put some 8" or 10" pneumatic tires in the front and have 2 eye bolts in the back. i hooked a strap to the two eye bolts and was using that to drag it with the 4 wheeler but my land is too uneven to pull it like that. I found a metal bar that looks like a hitch without the ball and it had a mounting plate with it. I mounted that on the tractor but the plate just bent. I am looking for a way to pull the tractor around like a trailer so that i can pull it or back it up where ever i want it. Any ideas?

    I have an issue with the tires as well. Does anyone know a good way to mount them so that there isn't a gap on the end where the tires are? I've been putting wood under the front to close the gap so the chickens don't get out but it doesn't offer much protection from predators. I would just take them off when its parked but i have to move it so often and the coop is really heavy so that would be a big pain.


    Here are some pics of the tractor.

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  2. CluckyCharms

    CluckyCharms Chillin' With My Peeps

    NICE coop, well done!

    NO LAUGHING at my stick figures allowed. [​IMG]

    If it were me I'd get rid of the tires altogether and keep it flat on the ground, this will help with critters sneaking in under the tire area, too.

    We've moved our friend's SHED like this (not a coop, sorry) and plan on moving our coop like this too. The one we have coming is 800 lbs. It's easier than it looks and you save your vehicles for the tough jobs - like getting a Slushee from Quick Trip when you're done.[​IMG] It's a lot easier than it looks and can be done daily with minimal effort by someone (male or female) of average health (barring disabilities that may prevent it from being done).

    Floor jacks can be purchased for about $50 for a used one in good condition - just use that to lift up your coop and shove the plywood and pipe under there with your hands or if you're lazy like me just kick it under with your foot (I recommend steel toes haha)

    [​IMG]

    As a side-note, my husband moves approximately 1,000 lbs at a time using this method every day at work...in a steel manufacturing shop. He's 5 feet, 11 inches and weighs 140 lbs. Even I can push the steel piles on the plywood without breaking a sweat (he made me try it one time because I was skeptical and didn't believe him, lol)
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2012
  3. eick61161

    eick61161 Out Of The Brooder

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    Check out this post, my design was based off this. It looks like you could put his design of handle on yours easily. It is a very sturdy handle. I can pull it around the yard short distances myself, or put it over the seat of my riding tractor to pull it distances.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/a-classy-a-frame-tractor
     
  4. cbenson6820

    cbenson6820 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the replies guys. Cluckycharms, your idea is very creative but i am looking for a way to hook it up to my 4 wheeler to drive it around like a trailer. I put a trailer jack on the back of it so now i can raise and lower it, i just need a good sturdy way to hook up a tow bar or even a tongue that fits a 2" ball.
     
  5. colburg

    colburg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You still looking for ideas? Where did you mount your original tow bar with mounting plate? Can you put up a pic of it?
     
  6. cbenson6820

    cbenson6820 Out Of The Brooder

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    i am looking for ideas still. i mounted it to the front of the 4x4 on the back of end of the coop but it wasn;t strong enough and it just bent the mounting plate.
     
  7. gladahmae

    gladahmae Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm DEFINATELY not an expert, but it seems like you'd have an easier time if you were hooking the end with the wheels up to the ATV. You don't have the issue of having to lift the weight of the coop off the ground, and you don't have to worry about the corners on the bottom digging into the ground when it's uneven.
     
  8. barnaclebob

    barnaclebob Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Put your wheels on the coop side. The coop side will be heavier so the more weight on the wheels the better assuming they are strong enough. If you put handles on the run side you may even have enough of a moment arm to move it yourself. You can try it out by trying to lift up the door frame side. If its not to hard then you are in business.


    As for the tires, they arent very big, could you let the air out of them to close the gap? I dont think you have to worry about the chickens escaping through that gap. Any predator that can get through the gap is likely to be able to dig underneath too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  9. colburg

    colburg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    You need a third point of contact. The best place to attach it to the coop would be at the top of the A-frame, the other end goes up close to the ball . A 2x4 or small angle iron would do the job. The second best place would be at the top of the vertical 2x4 that in between what you've already attached.
     

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