1. Yodaman

    Yodaman New Egg

    2
    0
    7
    Sep 30, 2008
    I am a newbie chicken owner. Late this summer I bought two standard Jersey Giant pullets, one banty cockrel, and one banty pullet. The banty started brooding a couple of weeks ago and with the help of this site I was able to break her of it (took about a week). Now she is not laying and she is getting picked on by one of the giants. She is eating, drinking, and running from the larger hen. I got a chance to look at her today, she seems to be in the beginning stages of molting, her skin is an off yellow? is that normal? I have done some research and it says to separate the bully from the flock for a week. I have limited space, would a large dog kennel work at night then coop her during the day? Suggestions.
     
  2. d.k

    d.k red-headed stepchild

    *The yellow skin is normal, if they are eating corn or marigold blossoms-- stuff like that. As to the pecking order and breeds integration problems, I wouldn't be of any help, sorry to say, but somebody here will be, I'm sure. Meanwhile, Welcome to BYC.
     
  3. needmorechickens!

    needmorechickens! Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 2, 2008
    West TN
    Congrats on breaking the broody, thats hard to do...
    The kennel should be big enough to put the bully in for a few days...
    It may not be a good idea to put bantys with standard size chickens (especially giants). There is so much size difference...do the bantys have lots of hiding spots in the run? you can just put things in the run for them to get behind or go around when they are being chased....maybe some roosts up higher than the giants can go.
    Make sure there are two feeders and two waterers so that the one is not being kept from food. (they will try to starve one out)
    ~Rebecca
     
  4. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
    We have a couple hens that go into molt right after being broody, even if we break the broodiness. I would feed her extra protein and calcium.

    Keep an eye on the flock. It may just be the normal flock pecking order. If it gets bloody, remove the injured bird for her safety.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by