Bumble foot Cures

Jspartans26

In the Brooder
Oct 22, 2020
38
59
49
When I was locking up my chicken coop for the night, I noticed one of my chicken’s feet were swollen, and I think it may be the early stages of bumble foot. She’s also the only one that won’t go up on the roost on her own at night. I had read that if caught early enough, an epsom salt bath may help, and I had thought of adding essential oils as well. Would onguard or lavender be safe to add into the bath? And are there any other treatment options?
 

chickenlover007

Crowing
Sep 21, 2020
411
2,579
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PNW
When I was locking up my chicken coop for the night, I noticed one of my chicken’s feet were swollen, and I think it may be the early stages of bumble foot. She’s also the only one that won’t go up on the roost on her own at night. I had read that if caught early enough, an epsom salt bath may help, and I had thought of adding essential oils as well. Would onguard or lavender be safe to add into the bath? And are there any other treatment options?
I would try to get unscented epsom salts, but ongaurd should work, and so should lavender. Do the chickens have eschars yet?
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
5 Years
Jul 19, 2016
24,241
98,974
1,331
Iowa
Could you post pictures of the swollen area?

I don't see any need to add essential oils to the Epsom salts bath. The Epsom salt itself will help reduce some of the swellings on the leg, kill most bacteria present unless it's a halophile, and most importantly soften the core to the point it can be excavated out.

Just continue to soak until the core (?), is soft, then take a pair of sterile tweezers, and scalpel, and try to peel away out at the plug, cutting any tissue if needed to get everything out. Once everything is out, apply an antibacterial ointment, or cream, like silver sulfadiazine. Wrap some gauze around the foot, and bandage with vet wrap. Change the bandage often, but wait until the hole is fairly healed or reinfection will occur.

Bumblefoot is often caused by excessive prolonged pressure to the dermal surfaces of their feet. Splinters on the roost, gravel in the run, wet bedding can also be predisposing factors. Correcting any environmental problems should be considered just as important as the treatment itself.
 

Jspartans26

In the Brooder
Oct 22, 2020
38
59
49
No eschars, and the swelling seems to have gone down since yesterday. Still planning on giving an epsom salt bath. Pictures aren’t great due to shadows.
 

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dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
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Glen St Mary, Florida
I dont see the telltale scab on the footpad, nor is there swelling or redness. No Bumblefoot.
If she doesnt go up on the roost at night, most likely she is at the bottom of the pecking order and is relegated to lower roosts.
When she goes out in the morning, see if she is walking normally and let us know.
 

Jspartans26

In the Brooder
Oct 22, 2020
38
59
49
I dont see the telltale scab on the footpad, nor is there swelling or redness. No Bumblefoot.
If she doesnt go up on the roost at night, most likely she is at the bottom of the pecking order and is relegated to lower roosts.
When she goes out in the morning, see if she is walking normally and let us know.
I will check on her in the morning.
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
5 Years
Jul 19, 2016
24,241
98,974
1,331
Iowa
No eschars, and the swelling seems to have gone down since yesterday. Still planning on giving an epsom salt bath. Pictures aren’t great due to shadows.

There is no visible Bumblefoot in the picture. Consider taking a pick and peeling some of the gunk out of the footpad webbing. Excessive buildup of gunk in the footpad webbing can lead to mud balls.
 

MANNA-PRO

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