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bumble foot outbreak!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Roy Rooster, Jun 24, 2016.

  1. Roy Rooster

    Roy Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Everyone,

    I have a flock of 11 BO and about 8 of them have comedown with bumble foot.

    I am aware of how to treat it. What I need to know is if I can get the staphylococcus from
    interacting with their wounds.

    Has anyone ever gotten a staph infection from treating bumble foot?

    I wear rubber gloves and of course sanitize after I am finished using bleach.

    Thanks,
     
  2. BuffOrpington88

    BuffOrpington88 Non-Stop

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    Hi! While the staph that causes bumblefoot is technically transferrable to people, it is very unlikely that you would get it simply from treating your infected chickens. If you were treating them with no gloves and a gaping open wound on your hand, that would be another story! [​IMG] But it sounds like you have a very sanitary operation going there, so there is nothing to worry about! Good luck!
     
  3. Roy Rooster

    Roy Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, thank you so much for your post. Yes, I use gloves, wear a mask, and disinfect everything with bleach. I washed any towels used in bleach with hot water.

    The fact that bumble foot is a staph infection just scares me. I was not sure if I could breath it in like a cold or flu or if I had to be careless to actually contract it. All I know is the staph is the stuff that rakes though hospitals and terrifies everyone.
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    An outbreak of bumblefoot can also be MS going through your flock. MS...Mycoplasma Synoviea..its a bacterial infection similar to MG which not only can effect the respiratory system, but causes infections in the foot joints and hocks. The infected synovial fluid leaks out of the tendon sheaths and down through the leg and pools in the pad of the foot. It appears the bird has an ENDLESS case of bumblefoot. No matter how many surgeries you do on the birds, it won't go away. So if you find that MANY of your birds have turned up with bumblefoot that won't heal after repeated surgeries, you may need to use proper antibiotics and treat this as MS along with the bumblefoot surgeries to keep the pads drained.
     
  5. Roy Rooster

    Roy Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yikes!! ok thank you for your post. Ok, so my first question is, is MS zoonotic? Will I catch it when working with my girls?

    The second question is, what kind of antibiotics should I use?

    What is the egg withdrawal on those antibiotics?

    Thank you, your post was very informative.
     
  6. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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  7. Roy Rooster

    Roy Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much. I guess I am in for a fun time.

    Did you ever contract the staph by doing the surgery without gloves? This is my real concern, i am terrified of getting staph from working with them.
    I plan to wear a N95 Mask, glasses, and gloves. Do you know if Staph can be contracted by breathing it in like a cold for flu or if it is only skin to skin contact
    with a sore or cut present?

    Some of my girls have BF in one foot others have them in both. It is in the early stages so I am catching it early.

    I guess I can say goodbye to eggs for a while. That is sad but I will do whatever to help my girls.

    Would it be a good idea to bleach out the coop and run area?

    Thank you for all your help, I may contact you in the future days. I am difently feeling overwhelmed as I deal with this. I just don't know where to start.
    I have 8 out of 11 with BF. ugh...[​IMG]
     
  8. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    You can't contract staph from the air or anything like this. It is a fluid to fluid thing. It has to come in contact with an open cut on your hand. If you have none, the staph wouldn't even soak through the skin. This bacteria has to breach your skin in some way, getting into an open wound. I have done hundreds of bumblefoot surgeries and have even been stabbed with a needle with chicken blood and body fluids on and in it!! LOL And I have never contracted anything. (Oh, I panicked, that is for sure! LOL But I was fine) There is no guarantee your birds even have staph infections, but if you are worried than definitely wear gloves. Wear two sets if you are worried. Cover all your cuts with bandaids and two pair of gloves and you will be perfectly safe. Wear eye wear too to protect your eyes as well.

    If some of your birds have this in both feet, I am thinking maybe they are just coming in contact with thorns or something. Generally MS strikes only the left foot. Rarely the right and even more rare, both. With MS, the birds are incredibly lame. I mean, can't walk lame, it is that bad. With the standard bumblefoot, they may limp around but aren't all that bothered by it. So you need to make a judgement with this one.

    Standard bumblefoot will heal quick, usually after the first surgery, no more surgeries are required if it is done properly. The average bumblefoot takes about 5 weeks to heal completely if kept wrapped, clean and dry for this entire time. The pad should start to look really good by the 2nd or 3rd week.

    With MS, the pad never heals, surgery after surgery and the infection gets worse and worse.

    There are a couple of other things that cause bumblefoot....jumping down from high perches...this bruises the pad enough to break the skin over time and they get bumblefoot. If you have high roost bars, lower them down close to the floor, I keep my bars about 15 inches from the floor.

    A vitamin A deficiency will cause the skin on the pads to thin and bumblefoot forms. Make sure they are eating enough of their food and not filling up on goodies or too much free ranging. Vitamin deficiency is a big cause of bumblefoot.

    So, do some analysis here and try to determine how and why they have bumblefoot. If these are simple cases of it or a vitamin deficiency, they do not need antibiotics and I would highly recommend you don't use them. Only if this is something more serious like MS.

    Keep us posted! :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016
  9. Roy Rooster

    Roy Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much for your post. You have been so helpful. I think they are getting bumble foot from the tree debris in their outdoor run. They run in under a tree, which is good
    because it provides shade, but bad when we have storms. We have had several really bad storms that knocked a lot of debris off the tree and I think they are getting poked by
    the twigs. I am keeping them out of their run till I can get all the sticks picked up.

    I don't think MS is the problem. They are all running around and look perky and are actually a bid mad at me for keeping them in their covered pen.
    So I think that all I am dealing with is bumble foot. I will make sure that I don't give them too many treats making them eat
    their layer pellets more.

    So, so I need to keep their foot bandaged for 2 to three weeds after the first surgery? How often do I change the bandage on their feet?

    I will make sure that I wear gloves, face, and eye protection when I work with their feet. All I know about staph is the horror stories that I hear about in hospitals when
    the infection is ramped in the clinics.

    As far as cuts, if I do have a cut on my hand is a band aid and a pair of gloves sufficient protection?

    Do you know how long it takes before the infection does them in? Since I have 8 that I know of so far that have bumblefoot
    I have to take this in bite size pieces. I plan to do it two by two, get two fixed up then do two more and so forth till I get to them all.
    I was just wondering how much time I had.

    Thank you again, so sorry for all the questions, I am new to this and want to be very careful dealing with staph or any infection for that matter.

    Thanks so much,
    Roy and Flock (Noelle)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Wow, love the chicken digs!!

    It's possible they are getting poked in the pads if there are a lot of sharp debris or rocks and such. The pads should harden up over time however and definitely make sure they are eating well so the skin stays nice and thick on the pads.

    After I do a surgery on a pad, I unwrap the foot every day after for the first 2 weeks to make sure it is not reinfecting, I got all the pus out and it is not going south again. So I will unwrap the foot the next day, if the hole area looks like a scab is forming, red in color, this is good. I will wipe it with an alcohol wipe and pack on some neosporin (without the pain killer) and put a precut small piece of gauze over the hole to protect it from the vet wrap and then rewrap the entire thing with the vet wrap. This is a chicks foot, but here is a picture of how it should look after wrapping...

    [​IMG]
    Get some vet wrap and slice it into 1 inch rolls. Then start in the middle of the leg, down around the pad, around the webbing and back up. Not so tight it cuts cirulation, but tight enough to stay on. Feel the foot about 5 mins after you are done and it should be warm to the touch. If the toes are cold, you wrapped too tightly, so rewrap. The gauze protects the soft pad from the latex in the vet wrap. The vet wrap sticks to itself so I give it a good squeeze after wrapping.

    I check the wound every day to make sure it is healing and rewrap with new wraps daily. If after the first day or so, it starts to look like it has pus or is turning yellow, I go back in and do another surgery.

    Keep the wound dry and wrapped for about 5 weeks or until the scab falls off by itself. Never pull the scab off, wait until it comes off by itself. If you don't keep it wrapped until then, infection will get under the scab and reinfect. By the 3rd and 4th weeks, I only check it every 3 days. The 5th week, I don't check much and then remove the wrap when the scab falls off. So expect them to be in wraps for 5 or so weeks. Bumblefoot heals very slowly.

    Just keep your cuts in bandaids and wear two sets of latex or vinyl gloves. Be careful with your instruments that you don't stab yourself as I did. LOL

    Take your time with things. Do the surgeries as you can. Start with the worst cases. Not all pokes and things on the bottom of feet require surgery. Only if there is infection. Sometimes it is light enough to just apply ointment and keep bandaged. Depends on how bad the infection has gotten.

    Good luck and keep me posted!! :)
     

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