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Bumblefoot and dark area on leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Therr, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. Therr

    Therr Just Hatched

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    Sep 29, 2016
    I have a New Hamsphire with Bumblefoot on both feet. I performed a surgery about 10 days ago which apparently was unsuccessful as she is limping around and now has a black spot on her leg. What's interesting is the leg will the spot, is not the leg that is swollen.


    I plan to attempt another surgery in the next day, hopefully tonight. My first surgery I used an Exacto knife, but I was able to buy a scapel and biopsy punches online...so hopefully these will allow me to get it all.

    I'm not going to take a $20 chicken to a $60 vet eval plus the cost of treatment. At what point do you cull the chicken and move on? I'd like to save her, but I am more concerned seeing the dark spot on her leg.

    Also, I have unexpired Amoxicillin (500mg pills). I was think I could split these in half and feed them to her. I am not concerned about the eggs (She hasn't laid any in a few weeks) Does anyone know if Amoxicillin safe and/or effective?

    At this point, I'll try anything to avoid culling her. I am not sure if she could eventually infect the other hens...assuming it leads to another illness.

    [​IMG][​IMG]


    Her right leg has some discoloration and her left leg is swollen. I realize it's hard to see.

    So the 2 questions are:
    1) Amoxicillin - OK or Not OK
    2) At what point do you cull a bird. (Not there yet, but I also don't want to have her suffer for a long period)
     
  2. adickenscoop

    adickenscoop Out Of The Brooder

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    I am sorry if this is mean but your post is very upsetting. That little hen is your responsibility. How can you say that the welfare of a living animal is not worth a trip to a veterinarian? It doesn't matter how much you paid for it, that is an awful thing to say. Many people rescue animals or are given them for free, and just because they were for free or for a minimal cost, it does not mean that their life isn't worth anything. If you can't afford to take an animal to a veterinarian when it is in need, then you shouldn't have any animals.

    Please take that poor little hen to the vet, or even better, contact a chicken rescue organization near you and surrender the animal to them before murdering ("culling") it.

    I have had a couple birds develop bumblefoot and they have fully recovered. However, I brought them to a veterinarian and did not attempt to perform surgery on it myself. How would you feel if someone who didn't know what they were doing opened you up and started poking around.
     
  3. Therr

    Therr Just Hatched

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    Sep 29, 2016
    I appreciate your position and I am trying to save her. I am looking for solutions, not condemnation. So many online source suggest culling the bird. My post is looking for solutions and trying to determine at what point is it time to consider this... I have tried natural remedies and surgery. Hopefully she will get better. Clearly your hens are pets and part of your family, mine are livestock. At some point I will be eating these birds...which if you've ever ate chicken requires culling, murder or butchering or whatever you want to call it. I doubt you judge people who eat chicken... If you have something constructive to say to help, great.
     
  4. runt325

    runt325 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2016
    dont cull the bird try to save her
     
  5. runt325

    runt325 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2016
    Give her some of that medication and it is safe
     
  6. runt325

    runt325 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2016
    hey and take that poor chicken to the vet one person told u that and I am not being mean but if u take the chicken to the vet u can refuse the treatment but it is not my decision its yours
     

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