Bumblefoot, big time

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by redmarealpha, Aug 19, 2014.

  1. redmarealpha

    redmarealpha New Egg

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    One of the battery hens I just got, has bumblefoot in both feet. Would black salve work to help draw it out? Maybe bring it up to the surface close enough I could remove the scab and pop it out without cutting so much? I'm not really squeamish, but I just don't know how well I'll deal with cutting a poor chicken's foot without anes[​IMG]thesia.
     
  2. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    I like to do a weak iodine solution soak on chickens with severe bumblefoot. Get a bottle of iodine from the feed store.
    [​IMG]

    Dilute a small amount with warm water (looks like strong tea) and fill a small pan-use enough to cover feet and legs. Soak for about 15 minutes twice a day for 7 days. If you see an improvement continue to soak for up to a month. Make sure to allow the legs/feet to dry completely between soakings. During this time you can evaluate and see if you actually need to cut out the infection. Usually the soaking softens the tissue to the point that extraction is much easier.

    I don't like to use oily type ointments if there is and active infection as this creates a moist place for dangerous bacteria to thrive. However, once the infection is under control you can apply vick's vapor rub (generic will work) twice a week. Not only will this help with possible fungal issues, the menthol will make the the scaly legs mites leave the treated area. Make sure there is good ventilation as you would not want to use a menthol based product on a patient kept in a closed area such as a plastic carrier.

    It is very important to keep the chicken in a very clean area. No shavings and use wide roosts that have been scrubbed free of all fecal matter.

    Some people bandage the affected foot but I've found this rather stressful for the chicken. If kept in a clean area, bandaging is usually not necessary.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What does this do to the bumble? Does it eventually come out on its own? Just shrink away?
     
  4. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    Soaking will soften the feet so you can eventually debride the infected area with your fingers or a brush (toothbrush works great!). This method really helps avoid having to cut out the area. The key to success, though, is to keep the area the chicken is in as clean as possible.
     
  5. redmarealpha

    redmarealpha New Egg

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    Thank you so much! I'm pretty overwhelmed with all this, but now at least I have a plan of action. I'll start it today.
     
  6. hollys chooks

    hollys chooks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Do look at your coop set up to reduce the height your hen is jumping to any surface, the height they jump from increases the pressure put on the bumble which my cause bruising that will slow healing.
    If you have higher roosts (which chickens always want to be on) perhaps look at putting in extra steps so they don't have to jump so far. I had to do this as my heavier hens were starting to get bumbles, they can now almost step between roosts rather than jump.
     
  7. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would that mean keeping them off the soil? Right now I am bandaging their feet as I cut but I surely would like not to cut. I could clean roosts but they are on soil. Does bandaging make it any less effective?
     
  8. BayBay Peepers

    BayBay Peepers Overrun With Chickens

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    I wish I saw something like this a few days ago. I would have much rather softened the foot for a scrub down than for a slice. Poor girl. The only good thing about it is it seems to be healing really quick. Holy constant learning experience haha
     
  9. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    If I'm dealing with a severe case of bumblefoot (barely able to walk) I will put the chicken in a hosptital cage with a wire bottom. Then I cover the wire with newspaper and change twice daily. You can use clean towels instead of news paper. Clean hay will work but must be changed out daily. At the very least you can keep the chicken on DRY soil. Chickens scratch in soil which will delay healing.

    As mentioned by another poster a heavy chicken jumping down can also delay healing so I try to keep the chicken in a smaller area.

    This method does take longer but you'll avoid having to 'cut' out affected part.

    Horse people will recognize this technique as it is a common method to treat abscessed hooves.
     
  10. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for your responses. I could put her in house for a bit.
     

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