Aug 19, 2019
2
3
4
First off I’m NOT a vet or a doctor but I’m posting this to hopefully help someone with a stubborn case of Bumblefoot / Bumbletoe.

About 7 weeks ago we noticed that one of our Ameracauna/Blue Andalusion crosses was limping badly. When we caught her we noticed that the 3rd toe on her left foot was grossly swollen and it was clear that she had a classic bumblefoot injury to her toe. In addition to this her toe was very hot to the touch. We excised the plug with a sterile exacto knife and tweezers and were able to pull out a lot of hard puss nuggets as and stringy puss out of the wound. We packed the wound with a triple antibiotic, sprayed it with Vetericyn and then wrapped it in gauze and Vetwrap. We re-wrapped her foot daily.

Over the next 5 weeks we performed 4 more surgeries on her toe, all with the same results: No reduction in swelling and still hot to the touch. We considered starting her on a penicillin regime but I was concerned that this may adversely affect her gut and make things worse so I did a lot of research on doing penicillin injections directly into the wound and found that Penicillin G (Procaine Penicillin) does not adversely affect the skin at the injection site so we decided to try this.

For the injections I used a 22ga needle on a 3cc syringe and injected .1 - .2ml directly into the wound for 7 days, each time followed by a spraying of Vetericyn, triple antibiotic ointment, gauze and Vetwrap. After a week the swelling was decreased by 80% and her foot was no longer hot to the touch. We kept her isolated for the next week to make certain that her foot was doing better and after that week it was clear that her foot was stable.

Yesterday we released her back into the flock and after a few scuffles she was back. This morning she was walking and running with no limp and seemed to be back to her old self.

Like I said in the beginning I’m not a vet or a doctor but since I wasn’t able to find any information about doing penicillin injections directly into a wound I decided to give it a try and it worked. This may not work if you have a drug-resistant strain of staph infection but fortunately we didn’t, and since it worked so well I’m keeping this trick in my toolbox for those hard-to-heal cases.
 
Aug 19, 2019
2
3
4
Hi Wyorp Rock,

Thank you for your reply. I'm sorry I don't have any pictures but if we have another issue (knock on wood) I'll be sure to take some pics of our procedure. We didn't think about taking any pictures at the time but in describing her toe it looked like a little sausage with a toenail. The swelling extended only slightly into the pad of her foot and was really limited mostly to her toe. The plug was a standard bumble foot plug only on the bottom of her toe instead of her foot pad which was a new one for us and created some challenges in avoiding tendons and blood vessels. I was very careful and used a headlamp and reading glasses so I could see right into the wound.

Hi Soy Milano,

A $250 vet bill for a $20 chicken doesn't pencil out, especially if you have as many chickens as we do.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom