Bumblefoot help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by tlmancuso, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. tlmancuso

    tlmancuso Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 30, 2016
    My hen has been limping and favoring her foot for a few days now and after cleaning her foot I think she might have a case of bumble foot. If that's the case how in the world do I help her?? I didn't even know this was a thing until today :/ [​IMG]
     
  2. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Yes, that's bumblefoot. It doesn't appear to be a bad case, but you won't really know until you get into the foot.

    Yes, you need to remove the infected "kernel". It's not hard. But have these things prepared ahead of the "operation".
    • Vetericyn spray
    • Triple antibiotic ointment
    • Epsom salt
    • Vet wrap or elastic self adhering bandage - cut into 18" lengths one inch wide. You'll need one strip.
    • Non-stick Telfa pads
    • Q-tips

    Run a basin of warm water with a hand full of Epsom salt dissolved in it. Soak the foot for fifteen minutes. Take the chicken out and dry the foot. Wrap your patient in a towel to immobilize her.

    With your thumb nail, scrape the scab until it lifts off. Usually, the kernel will come with it. This is a staph infection usually encapsulating a foreign body like a splinter. With a Q-tip or tooth pick, scrape out all the pus and yuck you can, then wash the foot again with soap and water, running clean warm water over the foot for a full minute to flush out as much bacteria as possible.

    Dry the foot carefully. Spray with Vetericyn. Let dry a minute, then smooth on the antibiotic ointment. Cover with a non-stick Telfa pad and bandage securely but not too tightly, running the vet wrap around the foot and between all the toes, ending around the shank with the end in back of the leg where the chicken can't peck it loose. Press the end firmly to create a "lock". This forms a seal against dirt, and you may release the patient back into the flock.

    If you encountered a lot of pus and the wound is very deep, repeat this process each day for several days. If the wound was small and shallow, leave the bandage on for two days, checking the wound on the third day. It should have a smooth dry scab. No need to re-bandage. Just spray with Vetericyn for a few days and it should heal in a few days.

    Take care you wear surgical gloves if you have any open sores on your hands since staph germs can be deadly and may enter your own body from your chicken. Wash hands thoroughly after this procedure.
     
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  3. tlmancuso

    tlmancuso Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you!! I believe I can do this!
     
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