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Bumblefoot or something else?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cowboysgirlfrnd, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. cowboysgirlfrnd

    cowboysgirlfrnd Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 25, 2015
    My buff Brahma has a swollen foot. Her right back toe is huge and she doesn't want to move around much. She free ranges and my girls go all over the place on ten acres, and they visit the neighbours. I've never experienced bumblefoot, and from what little I can see, it doesn't seem to be characteristic. But it's hard to say, she is so heavily feathered on her feet. I have isolated her and she is hardly eating. Her comb is a healthy colour and she is generally alert. I am going away for a week as of tomorrow morning... Is there anything I can mix into her food to help her? I have a housesitter but she's not really equipped to deal with chickens.

    Sorry for the bad quality pictures, but you can get some idea of what's going on.

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  2. Heidi65

    Heidi65 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 15, 2015
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    My Coop
    I can't see real well, can you see if the bottom of the foot has the black scab looking mark that is usually the indication of bumblefoot? Can you maybe move the feather some more?
     
  3. cowboysgirlfrnd

    cowboysgirlfrnd Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 25, 2015
    I picked her up today to move her and she does have a black mark on the bottom of her foot. So I guess it is bumblefoot. I'm leaving early in the morning, so I don't know if I will have time to do anything for her before I go away. What's the likely prognosis over a week? I feel terrible about leaving her, but that's out of my hands.
     
  4. Heidi65

    Heidi65 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 15, 2015
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    My Coop
    If she isn't moving much now it isn't a good sign. She really need to have it removed! It really isn't that hard to remove it, if you aren't that squimish. Bumblefoot is an infection and by the time she is not moving means it is getting bad. In my opinion it really isn't something that can wait a week!

    Here is the thread on how to treat it.

    I really do stress treating ti before you leave or having someone treat it asap if she is already not wanting to walk on it! Bumblefoot can be deadly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
  5. cowboysgirlfrnd

    cowboysgirlfrnd Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 25, 2015
    Thank you for the link, that's a useful post. I am going to see if I can convince a friend to come and treat her for me while I am gone.
     
  6. Heidi65

    Heidi65 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 15, 2015
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    My Coop
    I'm glad that link is useful for you. I really hope someone can take care of it because bumblefoot can be very dangerous for the chickens to the point it can maim or kill them. When they are not walking it has become very serious.

    Let us know how it works out for her!
     
  7. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 26, 2015
    Portland OR
    In addition to the link Heidi65 gave, here's a thread that might help relieve her pain, or carry her through the week until you're back:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/915880/bumblefoot-cure

    Think about it like having a thorn stuck in the bottom of your heel and cutting a hole in your shoe so the shoe isn't pushing on that spot when you step. Essentially you're building her a little "O" shaped shoe cushion- in your hen's case, to elevate her toe with respect to the rest of her foot. If your friend is willing to treat her and remove the scab, all the better- in case it's not possible, this is at least something to try.

    Some have used just the foot cushion and left the scab in place- over time it should get pushed out (others describe their experiences in that thread) and with the pressure off her sore spot, she continues on.

    There are a couple ways to go about making one- one suggestion was pipe insulation (the gray foam stuff, probably 1/2", maybe 3/4"??) wrapped in vetwrap that already has the hole in the middle- put vet wrap over the pipe insulation, apply it to the foot, then wrap her foot over the bandage used to protect the site. If it seems like you need more height to the ring, I'd suggest the flatter version of a hose ring (the little plastic O ring that keeps your hose from squirting water everywhere at the faucet or sprayer attachment)-- then put the foam insulation on top of it, then vet wrap the foam insulation and hose ring together... the part with the foam is the part that would face her foot. Specifically, post #1, 3, 8, 18, 22, 27 (most like your situation) are most applicable- since you're short on time.

    Aspirin might help her get back on her feet - I think the dose is 25mg per pound of bird per day, but double check me on that. Chewable baby aspirin (81mg) is my favorite because it's already sweet. If she'll eat it whole tucked into a grape or blueberry, or crushed into some plain yogurt or other favorite treat- so long as she eats it all.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2016
  8. cowboysgirlfrnd

    cowboysgirlfrnd Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 25, 2015
    Well, my friend did her best while I was gone, and when I came home Buffy was still going strong, but her foot was still very swollen and hot when I unwrapped it. I did surgery again today and pulled out a huge amount of chunky white gunk. I hope I got it all, but it was so deep, and I'm a bit worried there is still some infection in her back toe. There was luckily no sign of the infection having spread to the rest of her body.

    She has been resting in the coop all day. I think she is in quite a lot of pain, but she has eaten and had a good drink, so I'm optimistic.

    She has a lot of feathering on her feet which I have had to pinch a bit in order to wrap her foot securely. Will this be a problem for her?
     
  9. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 26, 2015
    Portland OR
    Wrapping is definitely the lesser of the two evils- the feathers do make it a little more difficult, but keeping it clean and packed with Neosporin (the original kind) is more important.
    If you can get her to take some aspirin, that will make her a little more comfortable.
     
  10. cowboysgirlfrnd

    cowboysgirlfrnd Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! I'm going to try to pick up some baby aspirin for her today. It was a little worrying how big a cavity there was in her foot when I was done, but I know she's a tough little thing!
     

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