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Bumblefoot???

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by auntb273, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. auntb273

    auntb273 Just Hatched

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    Can anyone tell me if this is bumblefoot? Just noticed my hen limping, and since I'm new to raising chickens, I'm not sure what to do. Any help is appreciated![​IMG][/IMG]
     
  2. auntb273

    auntb273 Just Hatched

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    [​IMG]
    Top of same foot with obvious swelling.
     
  3. cluckcluckgirl

    cluckcluckgirl Queen of the Coop Premium Member

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    Tending to my chickens
    The first pic is a bit blurry, is it possible you can take another one?
     
  4. auntb273

    auntb273 Just Hatched

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    I was afraid it turned out too blurry. [​IMG] We just put them in for the night, so I will have to try again tomorrow. If it is bumblefoot, what are the treatment options?
     
  5. cluckcluckgirl

    cluckcluckgirl Queen of the Coop Premium Member

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    Tending to my chickens
    Bumblefoot has the signature black dot on the bottom of the foot. You can treat it at home, or take him/her to a vet (whichever is more convenient for you). Here's an article going more in-depth if you are considering doing it yourself:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bumblefoot-in-your-flock
     
  6. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    Does it look like this? (Taken from Google Images)

    [​IMG]

    Some people get real serious about this and will actually cut out the hardened area, clean and wrap the foot with vet wrap. In this case the chicken must be kept in a clean area and isolated from the flock.

    I chose a less aggressive approach and soak the foot 2 x daily in a warm solution of either diluted iodine or diluted chlorhexidine for about 20 minutes. After about a week or two of this you should notice the area getting soft and you may be able to either lance the area(if abscessed) or scrub away the dead tissue with a toothbrush. I like to use this method with the less serious cases as the patient can return to the flock after each treatment. With time the foot will heal if the bird is kept in clean conditions.

    Also remember to keep your roosts clean-you can scrub them with diluted bleach and allow them to dry completely. Or you can replace the roosts on a routine basis.

    If I ever get a chicken with severe bumble-foot which needs surgery, it is treated as a surgery and performed as cleanly as possible. Always wear gloves when doing this procedure and once the lesion is removed keep the area bandaged for a few day then allow it to dry out. The bird must be kept in a clean dirt free area until the lesion is healed. This can take as long as a month. I will use injectable antibiotics for two weeks after the surgery.
     
  7. auntb273

    auntb273 Just Hatched

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    Thank you for the information! I will get a better look at it tomorrow when I have better light and go from there.
     

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