Bummed over Bumblefoot

Rainieb

Songster
Jul 15, 2017
69
57
106
New Jersey
Hello!
Yesterday I noticed a couple of my girls have a dark scab on the bottom of they feet. Of course from reading I think it’s bumblefoot. I bought everything to soak, and treat. I always thought we kept everything clean! Is there any way to prevent this? One thing I did read in my searches, the roosting bar might be too high. They are Rhode Island red chickens and they are heavy when they jump down. The roosting bars are also not rounded but they are square. We are going to lower the bar and perhaps change it to a round for roosting. Are there any other things we can do? Feel bad.
Thank you
 

Hen Pen Jem

Crowing
Sep 19, 2017
1,677
5,456
352
Southern California
Greetings Rainieb,

I've dealt with bumble foot quite a bit. Both in roosters and hens.

Bumble foot is simply a break in the skin, where bacteria enter and cause infection that goes unnoticed for awhile. It is most commonly caused by staph bacteria.

Bacteria is everywhere in the environment. No amount of cleaning can eliminate it, in a natural environment. Wild birds, insects, rodents and even a simple breeze, keeps bacteria and viruses mobile. Chickens themselves harbor many different bacteria in their bodies, as do all living things.

Perches are not the only way a chicken can get bumble foot. Anything that can cut or scratch the foot: wood splinters, small sticks, rocks, nails, glass, chicken wire, and the list goes on, can cause injury.

And many animals with soft foot pads get bumble foot, not just chickens. For instance, caged birds get bumble foot, their perches are round. Pet rats also get bumble foot. So you see, you have nothing to feel bad about. If you ran around barefoot, you might get it, too. But, probably not...people quickly attend to their injuries.

So, the question of how to prevent bumble foot still needs to be answered.

Protection of the feet. That's it, but how can you protect your bird's feet?

There are many things you can do. Start with their pen and coop. A soft substrate, such as sand or clean raked dirt is helpful. The perches should be smooth, sanding and feeling for splinters and/or sharp edges is helpful. If they leave the pen to free range, do your best to eliminate any debris around the property, that the chickens could cut their feet on.

Other than that, attending to bumble foot is something you'll have to do occasionally.

And some chickens, get it a lot. Like my rooster Mr. Frito. The vet says he just has a genetic predisposition for bumble foot, because his pads have thinner skin. Now, some keepers might just cull a rooster that is constantly injuring his feet. But, Mr. Frito is a great rooster; he is a valuable member of our pet family! So, he gets to wear chicken shoes that protect his feet. Of course, this presents other issues for Mr. Frito. In the Summer when temps are high, I need to remove his shoes for a week or two, sometimes. Or, he'll spend more time on our cooled, backyard patio. Also, some times a little pebble will get in the shoe. He lets me know, by lifting his foot, or limping. So, I still have to attend to his feet issues. :barnie

But at least he no longer has constant foot injuries. And if bumble foot if left unattended to, it can cause a chicken to go lame. It can even spread to the body and end the chicken's life.

It sounds like you are taking great care of your chickens, so don't worry so much. Let us know here on BYC, if you come up with another good way of caring for, or preventing, or managing bumble foot.

PICT0015.JPG

Sometimes, even a hen will need to wear the shoes for awhile.
PICT0011.JPG

These are my thoughts on your chicken's bumble foot issue. I hope they have been helpful.

God Bless :)
 

Attachments

  • PICT0015.JPG
    PICT0015.JPG
    1.2 MB · Views: 5
Last edited:

chickenMamee

Songster
5 Years
Aug 28, 2015
120
99
142
Hernando, MS
Hello!
Yesterday I noticed a couple of my girls have a dark scab on the bottom of they feet. Of course from reading I think it’s bumblefoot. I bought everything to soak, and treat. I always thought we kept everything clean! Is there any way to prevent this? One thing I did read in my searches, the roosting bar might be too high. They are Rhode Island red chickens and they are heavy when they jump down. The roosting bars are also not rounded but they are square. We are going to lower the bar and perhaps change it to a round for roosting. Are there any other things we can do? Feel bad.
Thank you
Lowering your roost bar will help. I have a large fat hen that seems to get the foot problems more than any of the others. Just make sure to boil it out with peroxide when you remove the top of the wound. I squeeze the wound to get fresh blood, boil it out and then pack with neosporin. I wrap it with vet wrap and she’ll wear it a day or so then I boil it again and cake the neosporin on again. It usually heals quickly.
 

Rainieb

Songster
Jul 15, 2017
69
57
106
New Jersey
If your chickens stand on wire or Anthony Sharp that will dramatically increase the risk of bubble foot approximately how high is your roost?
Hello! Thank you . Well we built it with three roosting bars and a ramp to go to each one. Let’s say, 1 ft, 2 ft and a 3 ft high bar. My husband thought they would use the little ramp and go to either one. Well, of course they “jump” up to the 3 ft high bar, then jump down... skipping lower bars. We plan on elimating the highest ones.. guess we got too fancy.
 

Rainieb

Songster
Jul 15, 2017
69
57
106
New Jersey
Greetings Rainieb,

I've dealt with bumble foot quite a bit. Both in roosters and hens.

Bumble foot is simply a break in the skin, where bacteria enter and cause infection that goes unnoticed for awhile. It is most commonly caused by staph bacteria.

Bacteria is everywhere in the environment. No amount of cleaning can eliminate it, in a natural environment. Wild birds, insects, rodents and even a simple breeze, keeps bacteria and viruses mobile. Chickens themselves harbor many different bacteria in their bodies, as do all living things.

Perches are not the only way a chicken can get bumble foot. Anything that can cut or scratch the foot: wood splinters, small sticks, rocks, nails, glass, chicken wire, and the list goes on, can cause injury.

And many animals with soft foot pads get bumble foot, not just chickens. For instance, caged birds get bumble foot, their perches are round. Pet rats also get bumble foot. So you see, you have nothing to feel bad about. If you ran around barefoot, you might get it, too. But, probably not...people quickly attend to their injuries.

So, the question of how to prevent bumble foot still needs to be answered.

Protection of the feet. That's it, but how can you protect your bird's feet?

There are many things you can do. Start with their pen and coop. A soft substrate, such as sand or clean raked dirt is helpful. The perches should be smooth, sanding and feeling for splinters and/or sharp edges is helpful. If they leave the pen to free range, do your best to eliminate any debris around the property, that the chickens could cut their feet on.

Other than that, attending to bumble foot is something you'll have to do occasionally.

And some chickens, get it a lot. Like my rooster Mr. Frito. The vet says he just has a genetic predisposition for bumble foot, because his pads have thinner skin. Now, some keepers might just cull a rooster that is constantly injuring his feet. But, Mr. Frito is a great rooster; he is a valuable member of our pet family! So, he gets to wear chicken shoes that protect his feet. Of course, this presents other issues for Mr. Frito. In the Summer when temps are high, I need to remove his shoes for a week or two, sometimes. Or, he'll spend more time on our cooled, backyard patio. Also, some times a little pebble will get in the shoe. He lets me know, by lifting his foot, or limping. So, I still have to attend to his feet issues. :barnie

But at least he no longer has constant foot injuries. And if bumble foot if left unattended to, it can cause a chicken to go lame. It can even spread to the body and end the chicken's life.

It sounds like you are taking great care of your chickens, so don't worry so much. Let us know here on BYC, if you come up with another good way of caring for, or preventing, or managing bumble foot.

View attachment 1579163
Sometimes, even a hen will need to wear the shoes for awhile.
View attachment 1579166
These are my thoughts on your chicken's bumble foot issue. I hope they have been helpful.

God Bless :)
Thank you for your reply! Mr. Frito is a beauty! I feel much better now. We will modify the coop removing the top two roosting bars.. (thought they would use the ramps up and down rather than jumping) and check for splintering. Also going to check their favorite areas in my yard.
And treatment is in their very near future!:th
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom