Bumps on feet but not bumblefoot

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Poppy17, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Poppy17

    Poppy17 Out Of The Brooder

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    Please help!: My Buff Laced Polish stopped standing up and I see that she has a big hard lump under one foot and a lot of swelling around it and the other foot is just swollen. I CANNOT find a sore anywhere.... Just the big hard lump. I hate to cut into it and possibly start some infection if it's not necessary. Can anyone who has seen something like this give me a tip? Of course it's a Sunday and I would have to call the vet in if I decide to take her in. I noticed this last night and she ate and drank last night when I brought her in but this am she is pretty lifeless and mellow... Not looking good.
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  2. willowbranchfarm

    willowbranchfarm Chicken Boots

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    There is something called Infectious Synovitis

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    Signs


    • There may be no signs.
    • Depression.
    • Inappetance.
    • Ruffled feathers.
    • Lameness.
    • Swelling of hocks, shanks and feet (sometimes severe and bilaterally asymmetrical).
    • Faeces may be green in acute infections.
    • Effects on egg production appear to be minor under good management.

    Read more here http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/99/mycoplasma-synoviae-infection-ms-infectious-synovitis

    And this is from The Merck Veterinary Manual


    M synoviae was first recognized as an acute to chronic infection of chickens and turkeys that produced an exudative tendinitis and bursitis; it now occurs most frequently as a subclinical infection of the upper respiratory tract. M synoviae infection is also a complication of airsacculitis in association with Newcastle disease or infectious bronchitis. It is seen primarily in chickens and turkeys, but ducks, geese, guinea fowl, parrots, pheasants, and quail may also be susceptible. Serum (preferably swine serum) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide are required for growth on artificial media.

    Transmission, Epidemiology, and Pathogenesis:
    M synoviae is egg-transmitted, but the rate is low (probably <5%), and some hatches of progeny may be free of infection. Egg transmission is greatest during the first 1-2 mo after infection of susceptible breeders. Lateral transmission is similar to that of M gallisepticum , but the rate of spread is generally more rapid.
    M synoviae isolates vary widely in pathogenicity. Isolates from cases of airsacculitis are more apt to produce air sac lesions than isolates from synovial fluid or membranes. Some strains produce the typical clinical disease of synovitis. The paucity of natural outbreaks of clinical synovitis in chickens in recent years may be related to the adaptation of M synoviae to the respiratory tract; however, clinical synovitis in turkeys is relatively common.


    Clinical Findings:
    Although slight rales may be present in birds with respiratory infection, usually no signs are noticed. Younger birds, especially those under stress or suffering concurrent infections, are more likely to be affected. Outbreaks of infectious synovitis occur most commonly in chickens at 4-6 wk and in turkeys at 10-12 wk. Lame birds tend to sit. The more severely affected birds are depressed and are found around the feeders and waterers. Swellings of the hocks and footpads are seen. Morbidity is 2-15%, and mortality 1-10%. The effect on egg production is minimal, but instances of egg production losses have occurred.
    Lesions:
    In the respiratory syndrome, airsacculitis occurs when the bird is stressed from Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis, or improper ventilation. In many cases, air sac lesions resolve after 1-2 wk. Early in synovitis, the liver is enlarged and sometimes green. The spleen is enlarged, and the kidneys are enlarged and pale. A yellow to gray, viscid exudate is present in almost all synovial structures; it is most commonly seen in the keel bursa, hock, and wing joints. In chronic cases, this exudate may become inspissated and orange.


    Diagnosis:
    A presumptive diagnosis can be based on the lesions and clinical signs, but laboratory confirmation is necessary. Skeletal abnormalities must be eliminated as the cause of lameness. The disease must be differentiated from viral tenosynovitis and from staphylococcal and other bacterial infections.
    The serum plate agglutination or ELISA test is used to detect infected flocks, but cross-reactions with M gallisepticum and other nonspecific reactions may occur. Reactors are confirmed as positive by hemagglutination-inhibition or by isolation and identification of the organism. PCR may be used to rapidly detect the organism in infected tissues. In turkeys, the agglutination test for M synoviae may not be reliable.


    Treatment and Control:
    Serologic testing and isolation similar to those for M gallisepticum have resulted in eradication of the infection in most primary breeder flocks of chickens and turkeys. Administration of a tetracycline antibiotic in the feed may be beneficial in treatment or prevention of synovitis. When airsacculitis is a problem, preventive antibiotic therapy during the time of respiratory reaction to Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis vaccine may be helpful. Medication of breeder flocks is of little value in preventing egg transmission.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  3. myfinefeatheredfriends

    myfinefeatheredfriends Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looks like enlarged hock disease to me. Separate the bird and try some terramycin in its drinking water (available at many poultry suppliers). Unfortunately if that is what it is it's contagious to the other birds.
     
  4. willowbranchfarm

    willowbranchfarm Chicken Boots

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    If this is the case here is information on it.
    http://www.canadianpoultry.ca/cms_pdfs/AviaTech_Staph.pdf
     
  5. Poppy17

    Poppy17 Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow, great information. Thanks so much. I'll try the terramycin and keep her separate. I appreciate the feed back and site references!
     
  6. Poppy17

    Poppy17 Out Of The Brooder

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    So it turns out it was frost bite. I had started her on tetrycycline and lanced it but now blisters are showing up and there are some darkening areas. Reading up on that suggests frostbite and I think I caught it early enough that she will not lose her feet but she may always limp. I am soaking her feet in Epsom salts a few times a day and putting Neosporin on her feet and may start putting bag balm too. She has started to stand up a bit more and doesn't mind the soaks. I put a piece of cardboard across the top of a bowl so she rests on it and her legs hang in the water. I feed her meal worms up there (the info said hi protein treats are very good for frost bite) so she actually looks forward to her soaks and is happy to sit there. Thanks to everyone who pitched in.[​IMG]
     
  7. Poppy17

    Poppy17 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quick PS It turns out that the color changes in frost bite on chickens doesn't happen for a few days or a week, so waiting to see color as a sign of frostbite doesn't work..
     
  8. Poppy17

    Poppy17 Out Of The Brooder

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    At day 12 the swelling is going down, but very slowly. I have gone from soaking twice a day in hot water with epsom salt to once a day but I'm still applying Neosporin twice a day w/ Bag Balm over it sometimes. The skin is peeling off in sometimes big pieces. Some toe nails are black, and I wonder if they will fall off. I'm posting photos of the worst foot at day 12.[​IMG]

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    The middle toe never did have a toenail from when she was born, so that was not part of the fallout from these frozen feet!
     
  9. Harry Rooster

    Harry Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    Wow, great picture taking. This is kindof what my Dominecker hen's foot looks like, now the other one is starting, but it's not hard. I thought it might have been a staph infection, but I couldn't find any marks from injuries, then I thought it might be sprained from jumping down off roost, but I didn't think a sprain would turn red like that and also affect the other foot later. Then I found what I think is lice on her, and thought that this might be the cause. I soaked it one time in epsom salt warm water with ACV in it, since ACV is a germ killer, also put a little peroxide in there too. I know this is safe cause I used to put it in my bath water for an infection on my leg, and it healed up without medication. Apple Cider Vinegar is a wonder drug! Anyway, I haven't soaked it anymore since the lice. Went and got some stuff to dust her with first, gona do it all tomorrow. Hope it works, and I'm going to put some vaseline on her foot and legs also, as suggested by some of these very knowledgeable folks on this site. Y'all have all helped me so much this past week don't know what I would have done without you. I'm glad you posted pictures, that helps. I can't because I only have dialup and it won't transfer (I've been told was why I couldn't). So that's why some of my posts are so long. I'm just trying to explain to the best of my ability so you can get the picture. sorry bout that.[​IMG]
     
  10. lonnyandrinda

    lonnyandrinda Overrun With Chickens

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    Thanks Poppy for this post- this is exactly what I am researching for one of my hens. It has been unseasonably cold here recently and I think the other chickens may have forced her to sleep on the floor instead of the roost. Here are my pictures for comparison. Based on your photos I'm hoping she will just lose some toes and not the whole foot.

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