Bunnies behavior

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by into_my_web, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. into_my_web

    into_my_web Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2009
    Newfoundland
    I had my two male rabbits in my kitchen today and the bigger, older male began (edited for content) the other bunny. Is this just my bunny mating or is there another reason he is doing this?


    edited to be more family and child friendly.

    Please use words that are not vulgar and crude.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 5, 2009
  2. Godsgrl

    Godsgrl Ostrich wrangler

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    at the zoo usually
    It is not a sexual act, even though it looks like it is. It is one buck showing dominance over another. Your best bet is to keep them apart. Good luck!
     
  3. LV426

    LV426 Chillin

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    Neutering is your friend.
     
  4. AK-Bird-brain

    AK-Bird-brain I gots Duckies!

    May 7, 2007
    Sterling, Alaska
    I hope your positive they are both bucks!
     
  5. chinbunny

    chinbunny In a hutch

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Make sure they are both bucks. you may have a surprise litter on the way.

    If they are bucks, you are lucky it was just *that behavior.* Most bucks will fight and try to tear each other part. Best to keep them seperate. You can get them neutered if you don't plan to breed them.
     
  6. gypsy2621

    gypsy2621 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 29, 2008
    New Hampshire
    Quote:Neutering may be "your" friend but it can also cause the rabbits conciderable pain and suffering.
    best bet is to keep them seperated.
     
  7. LV426

    LV426 Chillin

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    Quote:Neutering may be "your" friend but it can also cause the rabbits conciderable pain and suffering.
    best bet is to keep them seperated.

    Neutering does not cause considerable pain and suffering.

    You do know they suffer more when one rabbit rips through and shreds the ears of the other over a dominance spat or perhaps rips the belly out? And how about when the rabbits' hormones kick in and they start attacking anything and anyone that comes near them especially when kept in a cage. Or when they start marking territory with spray and then the owners abandon them because they can't deal with buck behavior.

    Unless you are a responsible and licensed breeder there is no reason to have an un-neutered/un-spayed rabbit.

    Neutering does not cause considerable pain and suffering.
     
  8. WhitehartRabbitry

    WhitehartRabbitry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you cannot afford neutering and don't want any crud bred pet quality rabbit babies (since if they weren't tearing each other up, it's quite possible one is a doe) the common sense thing to do would be to keep them separated.

    I've never kept rabbits together in the same area/cage nor will I start. I've seen does attack bucks, bucks cage fight through wire, etc.

    Common sense says if you want them injury free, or no babies, separating is a must.
     
  9. Overeasyplz

    Overeasyplz Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 8, 2009
    Leesburg
    Quote:Neutering may be "your" friend but it can also cause the rabbits conciderable pain and suffering.
    best bet is to keep them seperated.

    Neutering does not cause considerable pain and suffering.

    You do know they suffer more when one rabbit rips through and shreds the ears of the other over a dominance spat or perhaps rips the belly out? And how about when the rabbits' hormones kick in and they start attacking anything and anyone that comes near them especially when kept in a cage. Or when they start marking territory with spray and then the owners abandon them because they can't deal with buck behavior.

    Unless you are a responsible and licensed breeder there is no reason to have an un-neutered/un-spayed rabbit.

    Neutering does not cause considerable pain and suffering.

    Ditto, sometimes they will neuter each other and that is a horrible painful thing
     
  10. chinbunny

    chinbunny In a hutch

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    Quote:Neutering does not cause considerable pain and suffering.

    You do know they suffer more when one rabbit rips through and shreds the ears of the other over a dominance spat or perhaps rips the belly out? And how about when the rabbits' hormones kick in and they start attacking anything and anyone that comes near them especially when kept in a cage. Or when they start marking territory with spray and then the owners abandon them because they can't deal with buck behavior.

    Unless you are a responsible and licensed breeder there is no reason to have an un-neutered/un-spayed rabbit.

    Neutering does not cause considerable pain and suffering.

    Ditto, sometimes they will neuter each other and that is a horrible painful thing

    This! I have had bucks do that to each other if they got loose. Even had one rip the ear apart on another, tore his face up pretty good. Up until that point he had been a show quality cal. He did win the 'ugly bunny' conest at a show after that. [​IMG]
     

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