BUTTON QUAIL DEATHS

Discussion in 'Quail' started by comptoncritters, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. comptoncritters

    comptoncritters Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 10, 2013
    HELLO, I HAVE 40 BUTTON QUAIL, I HAVE TRYED EVERYTHING, BUT STILL I LOSE MY HENS WHEN THEY ARE LAYING THERE EGGS, CAN SOME BODY HELP ME
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    What are you feeding them?
     
  3. comptoncritters

    comptoncritters Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 10, 2013
    WAS FEEDING HIGH PROTEIN, BUT ISWITCHED TO PLAIN CHICK STARTER, SEEMED TO HELP FOR A LITTLE BIT BUT I LOST ONE AGIN LAST NIGHT
     
  4. GrandmaBird

    GrandmaBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 28, 2012
    Colorado
    how are they housed? in pairs or a group? are the inside or outside? too many questions. please lets us know how you are taking care of them. It could be sickness, feeding, or lots of other things. If the chick starter is medicated you will have sterile males and females from the meds in the fed. they should be on a good 22% or higher gamebird (turkey, pheasant and such) not chicken feed.

    are they dieing while they are laying an egg or what? they should have oyster shell for strong eggs. are they egg bound?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  5. comptoncritters

    comptoncritters Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 10, 2013
    I got them house inside temp controlled, got pairs , trios , and groups
    we had on high protein, was told to take off since they were not laying there eggs.
    I guess you would call it egg bound , you can see the egg , but it don't come out but the bird has died because of it
     
  6. MrNappy

    MrNappy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 23, 2012
    Ajax, Ontario
    Calcium is your best friend

    Feed em crushed oyster shell, chicken eggshell, ostrich eggshell, whatever floats your bubble

    They need calcium

    + If they are getting egg-bound that means they want to lay, so let them lay, and give em more protein
     
  7. comptoncritters

    comptoncritters Out Of The Brooder

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    how would the liquid calcium work? would that be the best? where can you get it?
     
  8. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    My Coop
    If this was happening to my birds, I would start by cutting way down on day light hours...enough to get them to stop laying and mating. Turn out the lights, covering their area with something so that they only received about 8 hours of low light a day. Give them a rest. Then start in with everything that has calcium....crushed oystershell in the feed, eggshells, kale is high in calcium, even yogurt. Anything that has calcium that I could add to their feed or as a treat. Lower the protein in the feed. Less protein means less production of eggs to be laid. The amount of protein has nothing to do with becoming egg bound, however too much protein produces more eggs.

    I would keep them from laying for a month or more and then if all went well, I might slowly add more light and up the protein and see how things went.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
  9. MrNappy

    MrNappy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 23, 2012
    Ajax, Ontario
    Yea, but if they're young birds some might still lay, he might have to do a combination of everything
     
  10. GrandmaBird

    GrandmaBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From the book "A Closer Look at Button Quail" written by Jodi McDonald of Braken Ridge Ranch, she sells it on her web site: www.brackenridgeranch.com


    Some causes for egg binding:

    Hen was too young or too old
    Hen were obese, with fat deposits in oviduct or around vent
    Infection or injury occurred in oviduct
    Birds were kept in area with improper temperature, generally too cold.
    Egg laying excessive, birds not given the winter rest period
    Diet was improper, lacking in calcium, protein, vitamins A, E and D
    Stress
    Egg was oversized or malformed
    Occasionally, due to hereditary factors, hens were overly small
    Clean fresh water was lacking.


    Hope this helps...:)
     

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