Button Quail

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Dill, Nov 10, 2008.

  1. Dill

    Dill Chilling Out

    270
    0
    129
    Nov 10, 2008
    FL
    I have some questions I was hoping someone could answer..

    1. How big of a cage in dimensions does 5 females and 1 male need?

    2. Could I feed them the same pellets I feed my ducks, only grind it up so the quail will be able to eat it?

    3. How rare is it for a female to incubate her eggs?

    4. Their life span is 3-5 years on average, right?

    I think thats all for now.
     
  2. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

    8,672
    67
    301
    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Quote:
     
  3. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

    4,654
    27
    251
    Jun 15, 2008
    Quail don't flock like chickens. They more naturally breed in pairs so most use a pair or trio. I would agree that 3 hens per male is about the highest you should go if you want all fertile eggs. If you just want to watch quail run around and interact then that group would work fine and you'd still get some offspring. I have 6 in a 90gallon tank which is 48"x18" or 6sq ft and that seems about right. Personally I wouldn't go any smaller. There's a difference between what an animal will survive and breed in and what is enough space to view their normal interaction and allow them to entertain themselves. You can breed button quail pairs in less than 1sq ft of space but I never would. I'd go a minimum of 1sq ft per bird if you really want to set up a cool pen where you can watch them interact with their surroundings.

    Diet will greatly impact lifespan. They could eat duck pellets but the females especially won't live as long. You'd be better off with gamebird feed or nonmedicated turkey starter/grower that has more nutrients and even then I supplement protein using 42% protein evo dog food on top of the 22% in gamebird feed.

    Take a look at:
    http://www.cyberquail.com/
    http://www.gamebird.com/button.html
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2008
  4. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

    8,672
    67
    301
    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    high quailty kitten food is better for protien i'd think as dogs/puppies don't require the high protien that a kitten would---from what i've researched.

    I use low quality kitten food and suppliment and it works perfectly fine. [​IMG] I also feed bugs though.
     
  5. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

    4,654
    27
    251
    Jun 15, 2008
    I'm getting really sick of people trying to tell me cat food has higher protein than the dog foods I use. Go try to actually find a 42% protein cat food. You won't. [​IMG] Especially not one with an accurate reporting of digestible protein. I'm talking high quality grain free stuff. Even the food my dog eats normally (evo is too rich for her) has a higher protein percentage and kcals than anything your buying.

    http://www.evopet.com/products/default.asp?id=1491

    I wouldn't use cheaper cat or dog food because for one the protein is usually not higher than the 22-28% you can get in gamebird feed, second it usually contains poultry byproducts that I'd rather not feed back to my own poultry, and last the ingredients are low quality and less digestible. There was also mention on here somewhere during an argument about feeding cat food that cheaper brands can cause a certain vitamin deficiency but I forget the thread and details.
     
  6. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

    8,672
    67
    301
    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Quote:no reason to get uppity about it! [​IMG]

    the one link I saw YOU personally post about food states KITTEN FOOD...lemmie find it.... alright edited to add it wasnt from the link you personally provided but it's here : http://ncws.com/mcdonald/CareFeed.htm



    "At
    Bracken Ridge Ranch, we use a custom formula chick starter blend.. which consists roughly of: 1 cup of Gamebird starter crumbles (run through a food blender), 1 cup high protein kitten chow (run through a blender) and 1/2 cup of a good quality finch seed." That's from Bracken Ridge Ranch I talk to Jodi a lot on ButtonQuailUSA and she's very informative, I like to go by what she has done for many many MANY years....30 to be exact.

    i also wanted to mention that not EVERYONE out there is going to feed their quail expensive EVO. I feed my dogs expensive food as do I my cats, my quail already get expensive feed so im not going to ALSO buy them expensive dog food, and i still personally believe that kitten food is higher in protien....and i also do not hav ea problem with my birds eating poultry...1. they dont know what they're eating 2. it's helping add natural nutrience back to themselves...kind of like how feeding a boiled egg to them does as well. What works for you doesn't mean it works for everone no reason to be all offended or whatever about it. [​IMG]

    When I fed raw food to my pets, I remember specifically that kittens have a higher need for protien than do other animals (including adult cats). I see that your evo is very high in protien...but as I said above not everyones going to go out and buy evo just for their birds sorry just isn't going to happen with everyone.

    I suppliment the way I see fit and I don't feel I need to bow down to evo to raise healthy quail. Many on here don't even feed their dogs and cats as good of food as evo and that's their decision. I personally feed my dogs Solid Gold Hunchen Flocken and suppliment raw, my cats get Wellness CORE (grain free), but um....grain free has nada to do with quail quails need grains. [​IMG]

    I'm not going to feed my birds what i feed my dogs and cats, sorry....that'd be too costly...great it's not for you but I already feed them well enough will mealworms, boiled eggs (dun dundun...they're eating themselves lol),and i'd happily feed them left over chicken....i arleady feed my moms pet chickens left overs of chicken...they love it...they don't know any better and they're fit as a fiddle. [​IMG]

    The reason I mention that kitten food could be a great option for people esp people on a budget is that kitten food at say a grocery store is i an almost bet/assume is healtheir for them than grocery dog food.

    More stuff I stumbled upon while looking up info: "Adult cats need 2-3 times more protein than dogs. Yet dry cat foods generally supply only about 1/3 more protein than dry dog foods—about 30-35% in dry cat food compared to 20-26% for the average dry dog food. "Kidney" diets for cats in renal failure are even more restrictive with 26-28% protein (such diets should never be fed to normal cats; they will cause muscle wasting as the cat breaks down its own body for protein). Canned cat foods contain 45-50% protein, and canned kitten foods may contain up to 55% protein. (All percentages calculated on a dry matter basis.)"

    http://www.littlebigcat.com/?action=library&act=show&item=whycatsneedcannedfood

    ^ which is why I also have been reccomending canned cat food (because of teh higher protien content) however that can get pricey for some as well. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2008
  7. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

    8,672
    67
    301
    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2008
  8. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

    8,672
    67
    301
    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    My good ole pal (kay she's not my pal, but I do adore her) [​IMG] Jodi (bracken ridge ranch breeder of bq for 30 years) just got back to me on me asking her questions about kitten food here's what she had to say:

    "Hi Niki,
    We only add the dry, finely ground kitten food to our chicks feed.
    It does not have to be a brand name food, in fact, the generic ones
    generally have a higher grain content and yet have about the same
    protein content as name brands. Because some brands have a high fat
    content, it is not a good idea to feed it to adult birds on a steady
    basis, especially during the summer months.

    Before everyone gets all jumpy with this, let me say that one of
    the 2 main reasons we use it is because cat food contains Taruine,
    which helps with young quail's metabolism. It also helps develop the
    central nervous system, is an antioxidant and helps process feed more
    efficiently.
    The second reason is that it generally has 18 to 30% minimum
    protein. When a chick hatches from healthy parents, it is
    approximately 15% protein. If it does not receive food containing the
    necessary protein it will have slow stunted growth. A chicks protein
    energy is divided between physical growth and feather growth. If fed
    a diet that is deficient in protein the energy normally absorbed for
    growth may be diverted to its feathers or vise versa. If a chick does
    not have the proper levels of protein and fat from the start, its
    natural instinct to forage for food an water will be inhibited and it
    will quickly die of starvation or dehydration,

    Ground cat food can be added to an adults diet when the weather is
    colder if additional fat and protein is required to maintain their
    metabolism. In cold weather, the birds intake of fat is divided
    between maintaining their body heat, egg production (if in a situation
    where they are forced to lay year round) and feather growth.

    But...a word of caution: Since not all fats are digestible, care
    should to be taken in the amount and type offered to adult birds.
    Since most labels do not identify the source of fat in feed, we have
    to assume that in cat food, it is a combination of vegetable and
    animal fat, and a little goes a long way in an adult birds diet. The
    over all amount of fat/protein should be taken into consideration when
    using cat food for adult birds. I.E. Meal worms, grow/breeder crumbles
    etc.
    Hope this helps. (Niki, our new website is
    www.brackenridgeran ch.ocm) We are using that site while we rebuild
    our old one at www.ncws.com/ mcdonald."
     
  9. Dill

    Dill Chilling Out

    270
    0
    129
    Nov 10, 2008
    FL
    I don't really care about breeding them, but I would like to have 1 clutch of babies (and keep all of them). I read somewhere that 5 females and 1 male was a good ratio so I went with that but if they'd be happier as 3 females and 1 male I'll go with that instead. I want at least 4 anyway.

    I haven't gotten any buttons yet but someone contacted me about buttons they have for adoption. still got to persaud my parents to let me get them though... any suggestions on how to do that? Like what are buttons personalites and such like?

    I want my buttons to be very healthy and happy so I wanted to feed them insects (esp the females) even though that's really going to be hard for me (I don't like killing things). How would I breed mealworms? They should have insects on a regular basis,right?
     
  10. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

    8,672
    67
    301
    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Quote:Hey there again [​IMG]

    well they dont have to have insects on a regular basis, but if you can offer them to them often go for it! [​IMG]

    Raising meal worms is easy in theory...however you have to purchase atleast 100 to startout with as breeders to get anything substantial going.

    YOu wont have to kill the meal worms, if you give them very young meal worms, (about an inch long and very thin) the buttons will swallow them whole happily.

    You can have the mealworms in a tupperware container with rolled oats or bran meal, and a sliced apple or potatoe on the top of the rolled oats or bran meal as moisture for the meal worms. THe meal worm only take i think it is a few weeks to pupate where they turn into decient sized dark brown bettles they breed, and lay eggs in the bran or rolled oats and the cycle goes on. [​IMG]

    Buttons are goofy to watch, and are just plain adorable...however they are a look at pet...not a pet you want to expect to handle. They are almostl ike fish or finches...just look at and feed and keep clean no handling. Buttons dont liketo be handled...I personally only handle my buttons for pictures if i need to show someone somethign specific about them, or to move them to a new home..otherwise I leave them be and they much perfer that.

    As chicks you can handle them (but be careful they are quick and tiny) and they can become hand tame but at some point they sort of get afraid of hands atleast so far in all my experiences they do. My first ever hen that I raised was afraid of me a week after she hatched....she's now 12 weeks old and is still afraid of my hands, but calls and talks (in button quail chatter) to me and even seems to think im her mate she's adorable and i love her dearly shes' fun to talk to through the glass of her enclosure.[​IMG]

    They are almost soothing to watch, the way the interact with eachother, eat and dustbathe in their bedding just really cute.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by