buyer beware

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by technodoll, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've learned the hard way that if you don't know who you're buying for and aren't experienced enough to spot the difference between a good breeder and a shyster, you get what you pay for.

    On Nov 17th, I drove over two hours to get chickens from a large, well-advertised breeder.

    The environment seemed OK enough, although a bit dirty. A bit smelly. Definitely loud with many pens holding assorted breeds of young birds. I ignored it all, even the water dishes filled with green slime. I know, I'm an idiot.

    According to the guy, he sold me four pullets, each aged roughly 14 to 16 weeks (two giant blue cochins and two easter eggers).

    $20 per bird.

    One month later, I can see what I actually came home with that day:

    -One 3 or 4-week old EE cockerel, riddled with worms and lice.
    -One 12 (?) week old EE pullet, riddled with lice and suffering a severe eye infection.
    -One 12 (?) week old bantam blue cochin pullet, probably mixed with silkie (she has 5 toes on each foot).
    -One 10 (?) week old bantam blue cochin pullet, also maybe mixed, had lice and an eye infection.

    The pullets are also no doubt infested with worms since they were all in contact with the EE roo in my coop.

    To recap:

    Birds cost me $80 plus gas money and time.
    Then $15 for antibiotics and gas money to the vet.
    Then $12 for delousing powder.
    Then $30 today for fecal exam and worming meds, plus gas money to the vet.

    My whole flock now has to be de-wormed, costing me two weeks' worth of lost income from egg sales (roughly $50).

    Let's not even talk about the time on the phone, the aggravation and stress, the chicken hospital set up in the house, the rolls of paper towels and disinfectants to clean up the stink and the mess, etc etc etc.

    Just thought to share my experience and maybe prevent someone else from making the same mistakes.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Princess Amri

    Princess Amri Is Mostly Harmless

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    best coast
    That's dreadful! I'm sorry you bought from a bad breeder.
     
  3. Bedste

    Bedste Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cut n Shoot Texas
    thank you ........ I have decided to hatch my own....... even better.... let the broody hens hatch them and raise them and save all the stress of introducing them into the flock later..... Also.. when mama hens raise their babies.... for some reason I never had to worry about cocci and they were on the ground from day one...

    I am so sorry to hear about your horrible experience. I hope the girls were worth it.... and lay many many eggs for you when they grow up!
     
  4. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Wow...that bites. [​IMG] Sorry you got the raw end on that deal, but thanks for sharing. It's good information for me and others out there who may be put in that situation down the road...
     
  5. Reinbeau

    Reinbeau The Teapot Underground Premium Member

    It's too bad you bought from a bad breeder, but you did something else you shouldn't have - you didn't isolate those birds from your flock to see what issues they may have. If you had, they wouldn't have spread their problems to your other birds. This is why so many here will tell you to isolate new birds for a month before you integrate then with your existing flock.
     
  6. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On the positive side, this experience taught me a LOT!

    I have now found two AMAZING breeders whom I can count on for healthy, pure-bred chickens as well as fertilized eggs, good advice and friendship.

    I'm getting a Brinsea incubator for my birthday next month so that I can hatch my own babies from now on, no more risk-taking.

    And... My first "home bred" chicks are due in a week, my silkie hen is working hard at making sure these babies hatch safe and sound!

    ps: the four "rescue birds" are real sweethearts and I love them, it's not their fault they were born in that terrible place. I'm just glad they found their forever home here with me, where they are treated like they should be. I just feel sad that I can't save them all.
     
  7. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Quebec, Canada
    It's too bad you bought from a bad breeder, but you did something else you shouldn't have - you didn't isolate those birds from your flock to see what issues they may have. If you had, they wouldn't have spread their problems to your other birds. This is why so many here will tell you to isolate new birds for a month before you integrate then with your existing flock.

    That too. Blame it on wanting to add more birds before I had a space to quarantine them (I still don't have this setup).

    It was a very hard lesson to learn, which is why I took the time to share it in the hopes that others won't make the same mistakes I did.​
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    If something is not right when you go to buy birds from someone, either the environment or the birds themselves, I hope folks will learn to just walk away (after telling the "breeder" why). Though your heart may want to rescue them, it's just not worth risking your entire flock to bring home sick birds.
     
  9. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is exactly the moral of this story.

    I'm taking the punishment on the chin and I tell ya, NEVER AGAIN.
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

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